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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Lineal vs Linear

    In construction, it is okay to use the term lineal feet rather than linear feet?


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    #2

    Re: Lineal vs Linear

    It is an alternative, but [without full context] you will be better understood with "linear".


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    #3

    Re: Lineal vs Linear

    Actually, they are not interchangeable in construction usage.

    From the Wisconsin DOT construction manual -

    Lineal vs. Linear Feet. When measuring length, use the word “linear,” instead of “lineal.” Lineal means belonging to or being in direct line of descent from an ancestor.



  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Lineal vs Linear

    Quote Originally Posted by David Carlson View Post
    Actually, they are not interchangeable in construction usage.

    From the Wisconsin DOT construction manual -

    Lineal vs. Linear Feet. When measuring length, use the word “linear,” instead of “lineal.” Lineal means belonging to or being in direct line of descent from an ancestor.

    interesting!

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Lineal vs Linear

    Quote Originally Posted by David Carlson View Post
    Actually, they are not interchangeable in construction usage.

    From the Wisconsin DOT construction manual -

    Lineal vs. Linear Feet. When measuring length, use the word “linear,” instead of “lineal.” Lineal means belonging to or being in direct line of descent from an ancestor.


    In Anglika's defence, I think she was saying that if someone (wrongly) said 'lineal feet' s/he would be understood as meaning linear feet. But I too have never heard 'lineal' used in any context other than genealogical.

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    #6

    Lineal vs Linear

    In retail environments within the fields of construction, manufacturing, and engineering, the terms lineal and linear often get interchanged without any loss of meaning. However, engineers know the difference. Lineal describes a quantity of material that has an implied width dimension, and linear describes a distance irregardless of width. As such, OEM manufacturers, tier 1 distributors, and engineers specify lineal units almost exclusively (the distinction has begun to erode recently), while anyone taking a length measurement is observing a linear unit. Consider the following example: "We need to replace a single metal panel, and the building's sidewall is 12 linear feet to the eave, so we will need to order 12 lineal feet of metal. " Furthermore, while there is always a conversion factor to convert lineal feet to square feet (defined by the width of the material specified), such a concept does not properly apply to measurements that use the term linear (despite the fact that online converters for the retail market are widely distributed on the internet). Reference for all uses of linear: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/linear Reference for Lineal as referring to matters of ancestry or lineage: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lineal OEM and value added commodity manufacturers, tier 1 distributors, and engineers generally do not market directly to consumers, therefore there is no readily available reference that I know of that describes the specific meaning of lineal as it is used in industry. I may only submit the above based on my own 20 years experience in using both terms daily.
    Last edited by Tdol; 02-May-2013 at 10:29.

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