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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    phrasal verbs

    How does one use the two phrasal verbs "move up" and "move back"? Does "move up" mean, for example, to have an appointment earlier/sooner or to change the deadline to an earlier date and does "move back" mean to have an appointment later or to change the deadline to a later date?

    alm


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    #2

    Re: phrasal verbs

    The other way round: You move back an appointment so that it is earlier and move up or move forward an appointment so that it is later - further away in time.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: phrasal verbs

    Oh wow! I have the opposite view.

    Jim will be out of the office on Friday, so we have to move up the meeting to Thursday. (For me, "move up" is "make sooner.")

    Jim will be out of the office on Thursday, so we have to push back the meeting until Friday. (I'd use "push back" rather than "move back" so that contributes to the idea of making it further away.)

    Or we could use the Indian English "prepone" to go along with "postpone."


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    #4

    Re: phrasal verbs

    These differences are so fascinating!

    I would say that, visualizing a month in a calendar, if an appointment has to be earlier than originally arranged, it comes backwards on the calendar, whereas one that is moved to later in the month moves forward on the calendar.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: phrasal verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    These differences are so fascinating!

    I would say that, visualizing a month in a calendar, if an appointment has to be earlier than originally arranged, it comes backwards on the calendar, whereas one that is moved to later in the month moves forward on the calendar.
    I cannot agree with Anglika. The phrases are used in the other direction, as Barb and unreg. suggest.

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