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    #1

    Meaning of two quotations

    May I ask what the following quotations mean? Thanks a thousand.

    "Mind! Don't let your head be the racecourse of others" -Arthur Schopenhauer (Germany)

    "A week is a long time in politics."

  1. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Meaning of two quotations

    "Mind! Don't let your head be the racecourse of others" -Arthur Schopenhauer (Germany)

    I think what Schopenhauer wants to convey by this sentence is that you should think on your own and have your own opinion. Don't let yourself be influenced by the thoughts of others, and stand up for your beliefs. However, I'm not really familiar with Schopenhauer's philosophical theory.


    "A week is a long time in politics."[/quote]

    Either this one alludes to the fact that some things change often in politics, one day politicians make a decision that might already be obsolete the next day. Political matters often change very rapidly. Or it means that decision-making sometimes takes quite a long time in politics. I guess the first meaning is more logical as one week is acutally a short time for politicians to make a decision, amend laws, put forward suggestions, discuss issues, or things like that.

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    #3

    Re: Meaning of two quotations

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    Either this one alludes to the fact that some things change often in politics, - and quickly one day politicians make a decision that might already be obsolete the next day. Political matters often change very rapidly. Or it means that decision-making sometimes takes quite a long time in politics. I guess the first meaning is more logical as one week is acutally a short time for politicians to make a decision, amend laws, put forward suggestions, discuss issues, or things like that.
    I wonder what language Schopenhauer was speaking. Whether it was him, or a translator, I suspect they've just translated a German idiom word-for-word; or else it's just a bad translation. It doesn't convey anything much to me.

    I believe the first person to use the 'long time in politics' expression was Harold Wilson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia after some overnight crisis or other, when the political landscape suddenly changed radically. Of course, many people have used it since then.

    b

  3. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Meaning of two quotations

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I wonder what language Schopenhauer was speaking. Whether it was him, or a translator, I suspect they've just translated a German idiom word-for-word; or else it's just a bad translation. It doesn't convey anything much to me.
    Indeed, I couldn't find this saying in English nor could I find a similar one in German. The only entry for the English translation is this post. So maybe it's really a bad translation, or it's a misunderstanding and Schopenhauer has nothing to do with it.

    Deepurple, where did you read it? Any source you can provide? I'm curious.

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    #5

    Re: Meaning of two quotations

    I didn't notice your nationality - if there was a German idiom, you'd know! I think your understanding of it is as good an explanation as any - 'Don't let other people occupy your mind with things that are important to them'. But I agree it's not very quotable.

    b

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    #6

    Re: Meaning of two quotations

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    Indeed, I couldn't find this saying in English nor could I find a similar one in German. The only entry for the English translation is this post. So maybe it's really a bad translation, or it's a misunderstanding and Schopenhauer has nothing to do with it.

    Deepurple, where did you read it? Any source you can provide? I'm curious.
    It dawns on me by BobK that it is an English translation from German.
    Anyway, Snowcake and BobK, thank you so much.

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