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  1. retro's Avatar
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    #1

    which idioms...?

    Could someone please come up with idioms and slangs that describe an action of being involved in something illegal but not committing it completely.

    Take a gang which robs a bank. The driver waits in the car outside, so he isn't taking part in the robbery itself though he contributes to it.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: which idioms...?

    They are accessories.

    However, since they were part of the planning process, they will also be part of charge of "conspiracy to commit robbery."

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: which idioms...?

    It depends upon the type of crime. In the US, for example, bank robbery is a federal crime and is subject to harsher punishment. The "getaway driver" would most like be charged with aiding and abetting. If the driver knew in advance that his passengers were planning to rob the bank, the charge would be conspiracy (which bears a harsher penalty). If a person was present during the crime but did not participate in any way (but yet did not to anything to stop it), they might be charged as an accessory, but most often such a charge doesn't hold up in court. In fact, many times such a person instead offers to be a witness for the prosecution and is then granted immunity from any charges in exchange for his information.

    As far as idioms go, the person who waits in the car while a bank robbery is being committed and then drives the robbers away afterward is called the "getaway driver." A person who goes into the bank with the robbers and just guards the doors and watches for police, or keeps watch over the employees to make sure no one triggers an alarm is called the "lookout." A person who agress to tell the details in court of the crime in exchange for immunity from prosecution is said to have "turned state's evidence."

  4. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: which idioms...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    It depends upon the type of crime. In the US, for example, bank robbery is a federal crime and is subject to harsher punishment. The "getaway driver" would most like be charged with aiding and abetting. If the driver knew in advance that his passengers were planning to rob the bank, the charge would be conspiracy (which bears a harsher penalty). If a person was present during the crime but did not participate in any way (but yet did not to anything to stop it), they might be charged as an accessory, but most often such a charge doesn't hold up in court. In fact, many times such a person instead offers to be a witness for the prosecution and is then granted immunity from any charges in exchange for his information.

    As far as idioms go, the person who waits in the car while a bank robbery is being committed and then drives the robbers away afterward is called the "getaway driver." A person who goes into the bank with the robbers and just guards the doors and watches for police, or keeps watch over the employees to make sure no one triggers an alarm is called the "lookout." A person who agress to tell the details in court of the crime in exchange for immunity from prosecution is said to have "turned state's evidence."
    Nicely done, Ouisch!

    Cheers,
    Amigo

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: which idioms...?

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Nicely done, Ouisch!
    Yes, she seems to have a suspiciously detailed knowledge of this .

  6. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: which idioms...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, she seems to have a suspiciously detailed knowledge of this .
    Ray, be sure to check-out the mug shots in your local post office! Perhaps we will find a portrait of Ouisch hanging on the wall!

    Nonetheless, Ouisch's detailed explanation is excellent! Kudos to our friend from Detroit!

    Cheers,
    Amigo

  7. retro's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: which idioms...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    It depends upon the type of crime. In the US, for example, bank robbery is a federal crime and is subject to harsher punishment. The "getaway driver" would most like be charged with aiding and abetting. If the driver knew in advance that his passengers were planning to rob the bank, the charge would be conspiracy (which bears a harsher penalty). If a person was present during the crime but did not participate in any way (but yet did not to anything to stop it), they might be charged as an accessory, but most often such a charge doesn't hold up in court. In fact, many times such a person instead offers to be a witness for the prosecution and is then granted immunity from any charges in exchange for his information.

    As far as idioms go, the person who waits in the car while a bank robbery is being committed and then drives the robbers away afterward is called the "getaway driver." A person who goes into the bank with the robbers and just guards the doors and watches for police, or keeps watch over the employees to make sure no one triggers an alarm is called the "lookout." A person who agress to tell the details in court of the crime in exchange for immunity from prosecution is said to have "turned state's evidence."
    Ouisch,

    Thanks for this detailed explanaition but my question rather referred to the getaway drivers' act of not completely involved in the robbery but of only contributing to it instead. He doesn't rob the bank but only waites outside and drives the robbers away.

    In Hungarian an idiom which describes his act is something like: He doesn't sh*t into the well but only onto the rim then drops it in.

    Are there idioms like that in English?
    Last edited by retro; 26-Nov-2008 at 16:11.

  8. supada's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: which idioms...?

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Ray, be sure to check-out the mug shots in your local post office! Perhaps we will find a portrait of Ouisch hanging on the wall!
    LOL!!! You're hilarious! Ouisch, please hurry back to defend yourself from Amigo's post.

  9. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: which idioms...?

    Quote Originally Posted by supada View Post
    LOL!!! You're hilarious! Ouisch, please hurry back to defend yourself from Amigo's post.
    Yes, Ouisch! Please hurry back and defend yourself!!!!

  10. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: which idioms...?

    I have the right to remain silent, you know.

    Actually, I've been a "true crime" buff since I was a kid - I used to read old copies of Shocking Detective and other pulp magazines that I found in my grandpa's attic as a youngster. I can probably name more members of the Manson Family than I can my own blood relatives. And whenever I watch a marathon of those "women who snapped and murdered their husbands" TV shows, Mr. Ouisch tends to sleep with one eye open.

    Retro, we don't have any idioms (that I can think of) similar to the one you mentioned. The getaway driver might be called the "wheel man" in criminal parlance, but that's about it.

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