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  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #1

    Questions

    Hello, everyone!
    I have two questions.

    1.Is the word 'medicine' used in the plural form?

    2.How would you use these expressions below? Are they interchangeable?
    Could you tell me the differences among them if any?

    a.take the bus
    b.ride the bus
    c.get on(in) the bus
    d.ride on(in) the bus

    I think... a. and b. are interchangeable. I'm not confident, though.
    I'm not sure about the usage of 'ride', actually.

    Thank you in advance!

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    #2

    Re: Questions

    1. Yes.

    2. a and b are usually interchangeable. Take is used more often in the imperative, I think. You tell someone "Take the bus" but you answer the question of how you got to work with either, "I take" or "I ride" the bus.

    c. get in/on - means to actually climb aboard, and either works gramatically, but I think "on" is more common in speech. We do actualy get inside, but on suggests that we are there for the ride. I think of getting on the bus as if I am riding some continuous pathway, like a moving sidewalk; I am on the path, as I am on the bus.

    d. Again, both are correct, but generally we don't use either in or on, with ride. That is implied. You simply "ride the bus to work." Even when the riding is more active, like riding a horse or a bike, we still simply ride it, we don't say we ride on it.

    The "on" comes into play when the object or position is described in more detail. We "ride on the back of an elephant," for example; not, "ride the back of an elephant."

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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      • Japan
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 2,698
    #3

    Re: Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    1. Yes.

    2. a and b are usually interchangeable. Take is used more often in the imperative, I think. You tell someone "Take the bus" but you answer the question of how you got to work with either, "I take" or "I ride" the bus.

    c. get in/on - means to actually climb aboard, and either works gramatically, but I think "on" is more common in speech. We do actualy get inside, but on suggests that we are there for the ride. I think of getting on the bus as if I am riding some continuous pathway, like a moving sidewalk; I am on the path, as I am on the bus.

    d. Again, both are correct, but generally we don't use either in or on, with ride. That is implied. You simply "ride the bus to work." Even when the riding is more active, like riding a horse or a bike, we still simply ride it, we don't say we ride on it.

    The "on" comes into play when the object or position is described in more detail. We "ride on the back of an elephant," for example; not, "ride the back of an elephant."
    Thank you for your kindness, jlinger.
    You've been a great help!

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