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      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #1

    many a steeple

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to purse words of the expression in bold in the following brief excerpt from the Dickens’ Burnaby Rudge?

    “One wintry evening, early in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty, a keen north wind arose as it grew dark, and night came on with black and dismal looks. A bitter storm of sleet, sharp, dense, and icy-cold, swept the wet streets, and
    rattled on the trembling windows. Signboards, shaken past endurance in their creaking frames, fell crashing on the pavement; old tottering chimneys reeled and staggered in the blast; and many a steeple rocked again that night, as though the earth were troubled.”


    In my humble opinion there is something wrong here.

    Bells From Many A Steeple

    They are from Rouen in Normandy, a city with many a steeple, ...

    Business evidently has its center there, and many a man is wasting the summer…

    Named after the many church steeples in Frederick, Maryland where this stout is brewed. ...

    Many find that their lack of a steeple or cross sometimes leaves them unnoticed..

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
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    #2

    Re: many a steeple

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to parse words of the expression in bold in the following brief excerpt from Dickens’s “Barnaby Rudge?

    “One wintry evening, early in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty, a keen north wind arose as it grew dark, and night came on with black and dismal looks. A bitter storm of sleet, sharp, dense, and icy-cold, swept the wet streets, and
    rattled on the trembling windows. Signboards, shaken past endurance in their creaking frames, fell crashing on the pavement; old tottering chimneys reeled and staggered in the blast; and many a steeple rocked again that night, as though the earth were troubled.”


    V.
    It is a stylistic way of saying many steeples rocked.

    Dickens wrote so that his work could be read aloud, and this sentence is a good example of how phrasing can make a piece more lively and rhythmic.

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