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  1. ivferraz's Avatar
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    #1

    Generation

    Should it be "Who is Generation Y?" or "Who are Generation Y?".
    And why?
    Thanks


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: Generation

    Quote Originally Posted by ivferraz View Post
    Should it be "Who is Generation Y?" or "Who are Generation Y?".
    And why?
    Thanks
    Who are Generation Y? = They are the people born in the period 1979 - 1999.

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    #3

    Re: Generation

    Quote Originally Posted by ivferraz View Post
    Should it be "Who is Generation Y?" or "Who are Generation Y?".
    And why?
    Thanks
    I think that most people in North America would say 'Who is Generation Y?', treating Generation Y as a group (of people). (singular)
    This is one of the differences between British English and North American English.

    North American English speakers would say things like the following:
    Who is (in) Generation Y?
    Who makes up Generation Y? ..........(Would British speakers say 'Who make up Generation Y?')
    Who are the people (of)(in) Generation Y?
    Which people (are in)(make up) Generation Y?
    Last edited by 2006; 27-Oct-2008 at 05:54.


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    #4

    Re: Generation

    To be honest I would probably say "What is Generation Y?" or " What makes up Generation Y?"

  2. ivferraz's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Generation

    First of all thank you both for your explanations.
    I put on a test the sentence "People who are in their mid-20s and younger", to which the students had to ask a suitable question according to the text. I expected they would ask "Who are the millenials?", as the statement above was the definition of "millenials" given in the article. However, several students used the other expression mentioned in the text, Generation Y, and some used "are" and others "is". I typed the two sentences on google, and both got several hits.
    I guess it might have to do with the distinction between BrE and AmE 2006 was referring to, so I'm accepting both. :)
    Thanks again.

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