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    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 25
    #1

    AT a place or IN a place

    Hi all,

    I have a small question. A friend of mine is setting up a website for business locations that are not hotels, and the business locations may not be the usual suspects, and don't offer sleeping accomodations (www.venues.be).

    Their new slogan / baseline will be:
    Bored with sleeping, meeting and eating in the same place?

    Now we are not sure whether the IN is the best preposition. Some say it should be "AT".
    Any other suggestions or alternative versions of this baseline are also welcome - provided that they convey the same underlying idea...

    Kind regards, and thanks in advance,

    Thomas


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: AT a place or IN a place

    Personally I would leave it as "in", which more clearly indicates a single location such as a hotel.

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    #3

    Re: AT a place or IN a place

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_BE View Post
    Hi all,

    I have a small question. A friend of mine is setting up a website for business locations that are not hotels, and the business locations may not be the usual suspects, and don't offer sleeping accomodations (www.venues.be).

    Their new slogan / baseline will be:
    Bored with sleeping, meeting and eating in the same place?

    Now we are not sure whether the IN is the best preposition. Some say it should be "AT".
    Any other suggestions or alternative versions of this baseline are also welcome - provided that they convey the same underlying idea...

    Kind regards, and thanks in advance,

    Thomas
    I note on the site you call them "meeting places". This sounds a bit low key. What you are describing are called "Convention Centres" (or Centers), which typically have large auditoriums, and small seminar rooms, etc. but are not hotels.
    I agree with "in".

  2. #4

    Re: AT a place or IN a place

    The difference between "at" and "in" can be very fine but "in" does sound better in the question you ask.

    One difference between the two words is that "in" implies one is physically inside a structure, whereas "at" may mean you are only in the close vicinity:

    He is at the stadium now. (Has he gone in yet?)


    GF

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