Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 81
    #1

    Question BE in Progressive form

    Hello, everybody: I have a question about English progressive. Here I have two examples:
    He is stupid vs He is being stupid. (the first indicates state, and the second event, because of the "being", right?)
    But, does the same rule apply to "He is ill vs He is being ill". More specifically, can we say "He is being ill", if not, why?
    thank you.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: BE in Progressive form

    Quote Originally Posted by guzhao67 View Post
    Hello, everybody: I have a question about English progressive. Here I have two examples:
    He is stupid vs He is being stupid. (the first indicates state, and the second event, because of the "being", right?)
    But, does the same rule apply to "He is ill vs He is being ill". More specifically, can we say "He is being ill", if not, why?
    thank you.
    In the case of being stupid it is indeed an event - but it is an event that the person is in control of. If he chose to act differently he could avoid being stupid.

    If you are ill, you are ill. There's no choice about it. So in normal usage 'he is ill' would be the only option. But informally, and in a joking/mocking way, someone might say 'He is "being ill" '; hearing the unusual use of the progressive, the hearer 'sees' the quotation marks and concludes 'Aha, So-and-so's just being a hypochondriac, as usual.'

    b

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,109
    #3

    Re: BE in Progressive form

    Quote Originally Posted by guzhao67 View Post
    Hello, everybody: I have a question about English progressive. Here I have two examples:
    He is stupid vs He is being stupid. (the first indicates state, and the second event, because of the "being", right?)
    But, does the same rule apply to "He is ill vs He is being ill". More specifically, can we say "He is being ill", if not, why?
    thank you.
    The first means he is always stupid. The second indicates that he is behaving in a stupid manner (now). So yes you are right.

    "He is being ill/sick" has the colloquial meaning of "he is vomiting". It's not used just to say that someone is ill.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] showing the will using present progressive form
    By Ju_n in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2008, 09:24
  2. verbs
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 14-Aug-2008, 15:48
  3. form & within yourself?
    By Eway in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 13-May-2006, 13:40
  4. first form vs base form
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Jan-2003, 17:01

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •