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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    "comma, comma, or" vs. "comma,comma,and"

    I found this on an application and don't no if it means "any one of them" or "only all of them together":

    Have you been charged, convicted OR plead guilty to.....

    What's the difference between the above and:

    have you been charged, convicted, AND plead guilty to....

    I don't want to lie on a application, but I don't want to volunteer any more information that what is required.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "comma, comma, or" vs. "comma,comma,and"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I found this on an application and don't no if it means "any one of them" or "only all of them together":

    Have you been charged, convicted OR plead guilty to.....

    What's the difference between the above and:

    have you been charged, convicted, AND plead guilty to....

    I don't want to lie on a application, but I don't want to volunteer any more information that what is required.
    The first means you have to tell them if you have been charged or convicted or plead guilty. That is, they want to know of your charges.

    The second seems made up. It seems that you can answer NO, if you've been charged and convicted, but you didn't plead guilty, ie. you were found guilty at trial. In the second, all three must apply before you need to answer YES.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #3

    Re: "comma, comma, or" vs. "comma,comma,and"

    Have you been charged, convicted OR plead guilty to.....

    The legal process is (1) being charged (2) pleading guilty or not guilty at trial (3) being convicted or found not guilty.
    Hence, it doesn't matter whether you were not actually convicted of murder or mayhem, if you have ever been charged with an offence by the police, the answer is 'yes', whatever the outcome of the charges.

    have you been charged, convicted, AND plead guilty to....

    I doubt that a form would say this. If it did, then even if you were charged and convicted of murder and spent 20 years in prison, if you pleaded 'not guilty' at your trial, then you can honestly answer, 'No'.

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