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    #1

    lose grip on

    Hi, I have the following sentence to decipher and I am not sure it makes sense. The sentences is the following:

    The pressure of life can make you lose grip on your principles

    I know that "to lose grip on" means to lose control of something. But I do not think that the intended meaning of this sentence is to lose control on my principles. That does not make much sense to me. I think it means to separate or to depart from one's principles. Is it a correct sentence in English?

  1. buggles's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: lose grip on

    Quote Originally Posted by juliojimenezr View Post
    Hi, I have the following sentence to decipher and I am not sure it makes sense. The sentences is the following:

    The pressure of life can make you lose grip on your principles

    I know that "to lose grip on" means to lose control of something. But I do not think that the intended meaning of this sentence is to lose control on my principles. That does not make much sense to me. I think it means to separate or to depart from one's principles. Is it a correct sentence in English?
    Most people regard their principles as things they hold on to, no matter what.
    However, everyone has a breaking point where they would sacrifice their principles if the conditions got desperate enough, so - yes, the pressure of life can make you lose grip on your principles.

    buggles(not a teacher)

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    #3

    Re: lose grip on

    Tnx buggles. I understand the concept of betraying one's principles under pressure. My question is more linguistical. What I am concerned about is the correctness of the combination: lose grip on-principles

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: lose grip on

    Look at this again. Look at the choice of words, particularly 'hold on to' and 'sacrifice':
    Quote Originally Posted by buggles View Post
    Most people regard their principles as things they hold on to, no matter what.
    However, everyone has a breaking point where they would sacrifice their principles if the conditions got desperate enough, so - yes, the pressure of life can make you lose grip on your principles.

    buggles(not a teacher)
    People talk about abstract principles by using verbs that typically collocate with concrete nouns. This is a linguistic fact about English (and about other languages as well - I'd have to check, but it seems possible that a - Latin - principium was something that one held on to [capere] first [primus]); so 'lose grip' is a linguistically appropriate choice.

    b

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: lose grip on

    PS Incidentally, my speculation about principium (which was related to the word for "prince" - princeps) isn't disproved by Online Etymology Dictionary. This is a chicken/egg question ("Which came first...?"). A prince was called a princeps for some reason, and I have a feeling the Proto-Indo European *kep (not sure if it's that, but something like it ) may have had something to do with it.

    b

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