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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile char and tar

    please, dear teachers and friends,

    what's the difference between char and tar?

    Many thanks


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    #2

    Re: char and tar

    As a noun, Char is slang for a cleaner [charwoman]or is a kind of fish; tar is a a dark, thick flammable liquid distilled from wood or coal or slang for a sailor.

    As a verb, char is to burn something till it is black; tar is to coat something with the substance tar.

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: char and tar

    I hear 'tar' is liquid, derived from wood combustion in the absence of air, but as for 'char', seems it is something related to the remains of solid biomass that has been incompletely combusted, however, I already heard 'tar' can be solid because it can be found in cigarettes.

    web definitions:

    char = The remains of solid biomass that has been incompletely combusted, such as charcoal if wood is incompletely burned.

    Tar = a viscous black liquid derived from the destructive distillation of organic matter. Most tar is produced from coal as a byproduct of coke production, but it can also be produced from petroleum, peat or wood.

    In this context, I can't see any difference between them.

    Is it possible to shed a light on that?

    Many thanks in advance!

  3. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: char and tar

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    I hear 'tar' is liquid, derived from wood combustion in the absence of air, but as for 'char', seems it is something related to the remains of solid biomass that has been incompletely combusted, however, I already heard 'tar' can be solid because it can be found in cigarettes.

    web definitions:

    char = The remains of solid biomass that has been incompletely combusted, such as charcoal if wood is incompletely burned.

    Tar = a viscous black liquid derived from the destructive distillation of organic matter. Most tar is produced from coal as a byproduct of coke production, but it can also be produced from petroleum, peat or wood.

    In this context, I can't see any difference between them.

    Is it possible to shed a light on that?

    Many thanks in advance!
    The definitions given above have made the difference between the two.

    For example, if a wooden log is burnt and then after letting it burn for some time you pour water on it, whatever remains is charcoal or burnt wood which is black in colour. It can be still burnt further. It means it has been burnt to an extent that it becomes black in colour.
    Where tar means the lequid which is produced by the combustion of certain materials like wood or any other oily substance. It is a complex form of carbon and it can be used as lubricant oil, binding material in making ashphalted roads and many other industrial purposes.

    Thus tar is usually a liquid now a days produced by refinding Cruded Oil(i.e. extracting Petrol, diesel, Kerosene from Cruded oil, and whatever is left if commercially known as tar). It is further refined to produce various industrial products like wax, lubricants, pharmaceuticals etc.

    Charring is phenomenon in which something is burnt to produce some black remains. It may be charcoal or if a person is burnt severly then we say "the charred remains of a young boy burnt in a fire".

  4. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Smile Re: char and tar

    Quote Originally Posted by SUDHKAMP View Post
    The definitions given above have made the difference between the two.

    For example, if a wooden log is burnt and then after letting it burn for some time you pour water on it, whatever remains is charcoal or burnt wood which is black in colour. It can be still burnt further. It means it has been burnt to an extent that it becomes black in colour.

    Where tar means the lequid which is produced by the combustion of certain materials like wood or any other oily substance. It is a complex form of carbon and it can be used as lubricant oil, binding material in making ashphalted roads and many other industrial purposes.

    Thus tar is usually a liquid now a days produced by refinding Cruded Oil(i.e. extracting Petrol, diesel, Kerosene from Cruded oil, and whatever is left if commercially known as tar). It is further refined to produce various industrial products like wax, lubricants, pharmaceuticals etc.

    Charring is phenomenon in which something is burnt to produce some black remains. It may be charcoal or if a person is burnt severly then we say "the charred remains of a young boy burnt in a fire".
    So, it means char is useless, the same material that was burnt could be tar, however, if it was over-burnt, the product will be useless, the char! (like ash or something). Otherwise, It's possible to find some use for the tar produced.

    Does that make any sense?

    Thanks for commenting!


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    #6

    Re: char and tar

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    So, it means char is useless, the same material that was burnt could be tar, however, if it was over-burnt, the product will be useless, the char! (like ash or something). Otherwise, It's possible to find some use for the tar produced.

    Does that make any sense?

    Thanks for commenting!
    No. To char [verb] something means to burn it to the point at which is becomes black. It does not mean useless, but means black in colour after burning so that it looks like coal.

    Tar [noun] is a dark, thick flammable liquid distilled from wood or coal, used in road-making and for coating and preserving timber.

  5. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: char and tar

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    No. To char [verb] something means to burn it to the point at which is becomes black. It does not mean useless, but means black in colour after burning so that it looks like coal.

    Tar [noun] is a dark, thick flammable liquid distilled from wood or coal, used in road-making and for coating and preserving timber.
    OK, thanks

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