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  1. mr.vi.et's Avatar

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    #1

    might and may

    When we talk about the future, we use when for something that will happen and if for something that might happen.
    The first modal verb is "will". So why is the second one is "might" but not "may" ?

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Wink Re: might and may

    Quote Originally Posted by mr.vi.et View Post
    The first modal verb is "will". So why is the second one is "might" but not "may" ?
    Hmm If you were talking about something that you would do in the future, but you weren't sure about it, you might use may (probable), might (less probable) or could (least probable); will is used to express the most probable future action:

    Kathy's just got two days off work. She will/may/might/could go to the seaside.

    In your example, however, they're not talking about any future events; rather, they're talking about an open suggestion, a general choice between the use of when and if - if you were to use when, you might use will in your sentence; if you were to use if, you might use might/may or could.


  3. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: might and may

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    Hmm If you were talking about something that you would do in the future, but you weren't sure about it, you might use may (probable), might (less probable) or could (least probable); will is used to express the most probable future action:

    Kathy's just got two days off work. She will/may/might/could go to the seaside.

    In your example, however, they're not talking about any future events; rather, they're talking about an open suggestion, a general choice between the use of when and if - if you were to use when, you might use will in your sentence; if you were to use if, you might use might/may or could.

    Also see the usage of will/would; shall/should and can/could.

  4. mr.vi.et's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: might and may

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    Hmm If you were talking about something that you would do in the future, but you weren't sure about it, you might use may (probable), might (less probable) or could (least probable); will is used to express the most probable future action:

    Kathy's just got two days off work. She will/may/might/could go to the seaside.

    In your example, however, they're not talking about any future events; rather, they're talking about an open suggestion, a general choice between the use of when and if - if you were to use when, you might use will in your sentence; if you were to use if, you might use might/may or could.

    Thanks both of you.
    But I have a query.
    According to you reply, too difficult for me to specify the boundary between "might" and "may".
    And according to the rule metioned, we will use "if" if something might happen.
    So, what will we use if some thing may (not might, aslo more probably) happen.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: might and may

    Quote Originally Posted by mr.vi.et View Post
    Thanks both of you.
    But I have a query.
    According to you reply, too difficult for me to specify the boundary between "might" and "may".
    And according to the rule metioned, we will use "if" if something might happen.
    So, what will we use if some thing may (not might, aslo more probably) happen.
    "May" and "might" are interchangeable in this situation.

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