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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 559
    #1

    Sit down/ Seat yourself/ Be seated

    Hi there!

    I'd like to know how native speakers of English use the following expressions depending on the situation.

    1. Sit down.
    2. Seat yourself.
    3. Be seated.

    Especially in a classroom setting, which one would be better for teachers to say to the students?

    Thank you!

    OP

  1. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Kannada
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 21,215
    #2

    Re: Sit down/ Seat yourself/ Be seated

    It depends on how polite you can be.
    Usually in a class room a teacher, or in army/office an officer is in command, and he can ask a student or his subordinate to "sit down"
    But when a guest arrives at your home, you are polite to him and say "be seated".
    "Seat yourself" is also used in the same manner when a person keeps standing and you politely ask him to seat.

    Thus it depends more on the relations between the two.

    P.S. : I am not a teacher of English, just someone who loves the language.

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: Sit down/ Seat yourself/ Be seated

    "Seat yourself" is rarely used in Br English;and "be seated" is very formal. The colloquial way to invite someone to be seated is 'Take a seat' (and informally 'take a pew'); or, at a table, 'Pull up a chair'. If they continue to stand you could follow this up with 'Do sit down' or 'Do take a seat'.

    There are lots of more or less informal variations like 'Take the weight off your feet' or 'Park yourself here'. But in the UK the two most common expressions are
    • Sit down [a request or instruction, e.g. to a class, which can be turned into an invitation by inserting "yourself" - 'Sit yourself down']
    • Take a seat [an invitation, e.g. to a guest]


    b

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