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    #1

    "were to be"

    "It'll give me an opportunity to explain what Ontario's involvement would be were Ontario to be a recipient of equalization in the next fiscal year," he said.


    Hi,
    Does the underlined part mean the same as "in case Ontario to be" or "in case Ontario is", please?
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: "were to be"

    Yes. The writer has no idea whether Ontario will be a recipient of equalization, but a plan exists for its involvement in case is it chosen.
    Were it to be chosen is an example of the subjunctive mood.

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    #3

    Re: "were to be"

    Quote Originally Posted by pyoung View Post
    Yes. The writer has no idea whether Ontario will be a recipient of equalization, but a plan exists for its involvement in case is it chosen.
    Were it to be chosen is an example of the subjunctive mood.
    Thanks.
    So, if I wanted to replace the "were to" for "in case", the right format would be "It'll give me an opportunity to explain what Ontario's involvement would be in case Ontario is a recipient of equalization in the next fiscal year,"?
    Thanks again.


    • Join Date: Nov 2008
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    #4

    Smile Re: "were to be"

    Yes, "were to be" means if Ontario becomes a recipient. Because the writer does not know for sure whether this will happen, he used the subjunctive form. However, he could just as easily have said, "...what Ontario's involvement WILL be if it becomes a recipient..." This is an example of a real conditional because the involvement is an actual possibility.

    I would change your suggestion to "...involvement WILL be in case Ontario BECOMES..." Then the whole statement is a real conditional, which is more correct.

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