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  1. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    out there?

    Hello, Teachers.

    What's the meaning of 'out there' in the following sentence?

    If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is a live in our time; who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia


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    #2

    Re: out there?

    It means outside this place [as if you are in a box and everyone else is outside it - out there in the wide world].

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    #3

    Re: out there?

    A figure of speech for anyone in the world, and no one in particular. Grouping people who are outside your own circle of friends for example.

    A DJ from a radio station might say "if any body out there have a question they would like to put to our guest John Doe, please call 123123" - out there then refers to anyone listening to the radio station.

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    #4

    Re: out there?

    ooop you beat me to it Anglika

  2. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #5

    Re: out there?

    Thank you, Teachers.

    I'm still confused.

    The sentence I quoted in #1 was from Obama's speech. Did 'anyone out there' mean 'anyone out of the speech venue'? And I found this phrase in lyrics, such as
    Somewhere out there
    Beneath the pale moonlight
    Someones thinking of me
    And loving me tonight

    Somewhere out there
    Someones saying a prayer
    That we'll find one another
    In that big somewhere out there

    ...
    What does 'somewhere out there' refer to?

  3. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #6

    Re: out there?

    Quote Originally Posted by mxreader View Post
    A figure of speech for anyone in the world, and no one in particular. Grouping people who are outside your own circle of friends for example.

    A DJ from a radio station might say "if any body out there have a question they would like to put to our guest John Doe, please call 123123" - out there then refers to anyone listening to the radio station.
    Thank you for your explanation, Teacher Mxreader.

    What's the meaning of 'figure' here?

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    #7

    Re: out there?

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Thank you for your explanation, Teacher Mxreader.

    What's the meaning of 'figure' here?
    "figure of speech" is a way of saying something expressively that is not straight forward. Some examples may help:

    "It's raining cats and dogs" it means it is raining hard, not actually raining cats and dogs of course.

    "I have butterflies in my stomach" it means I am nervous, I don't actually have butterflies in my stomach.

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    #8

    Re: out there?

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Thank you, Teachers.

    I'm still confused.

    The sentence I quoted in #1 was from Obama's speech. Did 'anyone out there' mean 'anyone out of the speech venue'?
    Basically it means anyone that is listening or will be listening to Obama.

  4. enydia's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: out there?

    Quote Originally Posted by mxreader View Post
    "figure of speech" is a way of saying something expressively that is not straight forward. Some examples may help:

    "It's raining cats and dogs" it means it is raining hard, not actually raining cats and dogs of course.

    "I have butterflies in my stomach" it means I am nervous, I don't actually have butterflies in my stomach.

    Very helpful!!

    Thanks a bunch.

    Another question:
    Is 'out there' a formal expression or unformal one?

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