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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 189
    #1

    be seen

    I knew it was there, but there was nothing to see.
    I don't think it is good English.
    In my opinion,this is better:
    I knew it was there, but there was nothing to be seen.
    right?
    Many thanks.
    Last edited by norwolf; 06-Nov-2008 at 17:02.

  1. I'm With Stupid's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 598
    #2

    Re: be seen

    Both are acceptable.

    Not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 189
    #3

    Re: be seen

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm With Stupid View Post
    Both are acceptable.

    Not a teacher.
    Sorry. I still don't understand.
    A famous Chinese grammarian says:
    "There is nothing to see." means "Nothing is worthy of seeing.".
    And, "There is nothing to be seen." means "People can see nothing."
    Was he right?
    Does it sound old-fashioned?
    Last edited by norwolf; 06-Nov-2008 at 16:52.

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