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    #1

    I hope ..

    Hello everybody ,

    I have a question about the possible and correct usage of tenses after the verb "hope" in the example below :

    "I hope it will not be long before we meet again ."

    I think that the sentence above is a grammatically correct and regular expression for the idea conveyed with the sentence .My question is whether it would be correct to use the simple past or present perfect form of the verb "meet" in the given sentence to convey the same idea :

    " I hope it will not be long before we have met again ."

    or

    " I hope it will not be long before we met again ."

    And if those two sentences are correct too, is there any difference in the meaning ?

    Thanks a lot for the answer

    Best regards

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I hope ..

    Quote Originally Posted by velimir View Post
    Hello everybody ,

    I have a question about the possible and correct usage of tenses after the verb "hope" in the example below :

    "I hope it will not be long before we meet again ."

    I think that the sentence above is a grammatically correct and regular expression for the idea conveyed with the sentence .My question is whether it would be correct to use the simple past or present perfect form of the verb "meet" in the given sentence to convey the same idea :

    " I hope it will not be long before we have met again ."

    or

    " I hope it will not be long before we met again ."

    And if those two sentences are correct too, is there any difference in the meaning ?

    Thanks a lot for the answer

    Best regards
    The present is always right. The future is sometimes acceptable:

    'I hope you have a good time at Nottingham.'

    but

    'I hope she will have a good time at Nottingham - though I have my doubts.'

    But when the wish is for the future, the past tense isn't acceptable. In 'I hope he had a good time in Brazil. We'll find out when he wakes up' the wish is not for the future (it's about a future conversation - or other means of discovering - about a past event).

    b

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    #3

    Re: I hope ..

    Hello BobK,

    First , thank you for the clear answer. I have two more questions if you would be so kind as to answer.

    1. I understand that after the verb "hope" it is common to use the simple present tense to refer to future but the use of the simple future tense is sometimes acceptable too with the same meaning. For example, do the below sentences have the same meaning :

    "I hope it works"

    and

    " I hope it will work"

    And does the used verb affects if the simple future tense is acceptable ?


    2. I understood that the use of past tenses after "hope" is inappropriate to refer to future but I wonder if it is the is true if I use it after "until" ,i .e

    " We will not stop untill we have finished. "

    or

    " We will not stop untill we finished"

    Thanks again for the help
    Last edited by velimir; 06-Nov-2008 at 19:55.

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    #4

    Re: I hope ..

    1. He said that the present is right :).so, it does not affect to the meaning of sentence.

    2. It's nonsense when you use simple past.

    We will not stop until we finish it.

    We will not stop until we have finished it. ( some kind of emphasize)

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    #5

    Re: I hope ..

    Hello Kathie,

    Thank you very much for your answer. I guessed it so too ,only I had to check it with the teachers here

    Best wishes

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    #6

    Re: I hope ..

    Quote Originally Posted by velimir View Post
    Hello BobK,

    First , thank you for the clear answer. I have two more questions if you would be so kind as to answer.

    1. I understand that after the verb "hope" it is common to use the simple present tense to refer to future but the use of the simple future tense is sometimes acceptable too with the same meaning. For example, do the below sentences have the same meaning :

    "I hope it works"

    and

    " I hope it will work" - but be careful - see below

    And does the used verb affects if the simple future tense is acceptable ?


    2. I understood that the use of past tenses after "hope" is inappropriate to refer to future but I wonder if it is the is true if I use it after "until" ,i .e

    " We will not stop until[l] we have finished. The Present perfect is not a past tense.

    or

    " We will not stop until[l] we finished"

    Thanks again for the help
    Using the present tense after a wish for the future is 'a safe bet' - it is rarely wrong and it is usually clear. When I said 'you can sometimes use the future' (or whatever I said ) I didn't mean you could always use whichever you like. 'I hope it works' says something about what you hope; 'I hope it will work' says the same, but it also implies that you are doubtful.

    I said 'rarely/usually' in my first sentence because with verbs referring to a state, 'hope' behaves differently. 'I hope you are happy' suggests that I have my doubts; a mother on the telephone to her 14-year-old son , away on a school trip for the first time, might say 'I hope you are eating enough' or 'I hope they are feeding you well'. With this sort of verb, if you don't want to express doubt in this way, you do have to use the future: 'I hope you will be happy'.

    If you want to discuss your second question further, please start a new thread. Although it mentions "hope", that word doesn't appear in the examples.

    b

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    #7

    Re: I hope ..

    Hello BobK,

    Again, thanks for your help. I think I got it right this time . And about the second question and the examples, I would like to have a bit of explanation on this point too so I'll start a new thread then

    Best regards
    Last edited by velimir; 07-Nov-2008 at 20:59.

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