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    #1

    "As to", "As for"

    I see quite similar definitions for "As to" and "As for". I figure there are nuances that escape me...

    Thanks,


    Z

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: "As to", "As for"

    Quote Originally Posted by Zague View Post
    I see quite similar definitions for "As to" and "As for". I figure there are nuances that escape me...

    Thanks,


    Z
    Basically the meaning is the same: with regard to or in reference to
    How ever, the finer nuances lie in their use because of two different prepositions ‘for’ and ‘to’. When you want to say something in reference to something use “As for”.
    Example: As for sending the parcel, I have forgotten it completely.
    When you want to say something directed at something use “As to”
    Example: We are puzzled as to how it happened.

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