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  1. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #1

    Post Much Obliged

    Hi,

    I received a medical report, and towards the end the doctor wrote:

    Much Obliged
    Dr. and he mentioned his name"

    So I assume it means "Thankfully, Dr. ...."

    So it is the same?
    In what contexts do we use "Much Obliged" to end a letter?
    Is it so official or can I use it to conclude an email sent to a friend?

    Thanks :)

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Much Obliged

    [I'm not a teacher.]

    Hi Ducklet Cat,

    Here's a definition from Cambrige Dictionary.

    (be) much obliged FORMAL

    used to thank someone and say that you are grateful:


    "Here's the information you requested." "Oh, (I'm) much obliged (to you)."

  3. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Much Obliged

    Thanks thedaffodils. :)


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    #4

    Re: Much Obliged

    So - why is the doctor 'obliged' to you?
    Your preamble indicates he is merely sending you a copy of a medical report.

    Does he see his medical practice more as a business enterprise, and so is appreciative of your custom(=Brit. - regular dealings with a shop or business by customers.)?

  4. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Much Obliged

    David L.

    I don't know. But it was written by a radiologist. So I think he was thanking the doctor who will read the report not me.


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    #6

    Re: Much Obliged

    Got you! He was actually writing to your doctor, not to you.

  5. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Much Obliged

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Got you! He was actually writing to your doctor, not to you.
    Well, not really. :)
    He did not start the Report with the usual "Dear Dr." or "Dear Colleague"
    So I did not know whom he was addressing, but the closest thing would be thanking my doctor not me.

    But still, this the first time I see "Much Obliged" as a form of thanking. It is obsolete or still used?

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    #8

    Re: Much Obliged

    this thread is very interesting because "much obliged" is a literal translation of how we say "thank you" in my native language.

    and, as far as I know, my native language and English are not that related.

    if this is a possible expression in English, I would say that there are more things in common among the Western European languages that one can say.

    just a student.

  6. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Much Obliged

    Interesting input jctgf.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Much Obliged

    Indeed. It is not very common, but it is still used - perhaps it's a little dated though. (My father used it.)

    Muito obrigado

    b

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