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  1. Newbie
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    • Join Date: Nov 2008
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    #1

    Ever on the search for legal jokes not necessarily connected with2 the death penalty,

    Ever on the search for legal jokes not necessarily connected with
    the death penalty, I consulted a friend of mine who is still a practising
    banister. She said a member of her chambers was in court one Monday
    morning when the judge said, "I'm afraid we'll have to adjourn this
    case -1 have written my judgment out, but left it in my cottage in
    Devon and I can't get it sent here until tomorrow."
    "Fax it up, my Lord," the helpful barrister suggested,
    8 to which his Lordship replied, "Yes, it does rather."
    -----------------------------------------------------

    Q;I read it in first page of chapter6 (The sound pattern of language).in "the study of language" George Yule.
    do those sentences have any relation with sound pattern of language?
    Last edited by mehdi4u; 12-Nov-2008 at 15:31.

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: Ever on the search for legal jokes not necessarily connected with2 the death pena

    Quote Originally Posted by mehdi4u View Post
    Ever on the search for legal jokes not necessarily connected with
    the death penalty, I consulted a friend of mine who is still a practising
    banister. She said a member of her chambers was in court one Monday
    morning when the judge said, "I'm afraid we'll have to adjourn this
    case -1 have written my judgment out, but left it in my cottage in
    Devon and I can't get it sent here until tomorrow."
    "Fax it up, my Lord," the helpful barrister suggested,
    8 to which his Lordship replied, "Yes, it does rather."
    -----------------------------------------------------

    Q;I read it in first page of chapter6 (The sound pattern of language).in "the study of language" George Yule.
    do those sentences have any relation with sound pattern of language?
    Yes. The point is that the sound pattern of English differs from place to place. The word "fax" has no homonym in English.

    The RBP version of "fax" is /fæks/. The barrister had a northern accent (he was a clerk in the more snobbish version I've heard - underlining the stereotype of the working man as a northerner) and he used a vowel approximating to the IPA's [ɑ], but the judge misheard this as /ʌ/.

    This sound difference works both ways, as there are systematic differences in several vowels; I had a northern friend who accused southerners of saying the word in question as if it were written "fark".

    So maybe 'the sound pattern of language' is not quite appropriate - more like 'the different sound patterns of regional pronunciations of the English language'.

    b

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