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  1. Unregistered.YoungPadawan
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    #1

    "be proud of" Gerund

    I'm here the first time. I have been studying english as a foreign language . I must confess that I cannot speak english as well as 3-year-old native speaker. I'm a starter.
    I would appreciate it if you would answer to my questions.

    My question is :
    Are these correct english?
    " I'm proud of him being a Marine "
    " I'm proud of being rich."
    " Proud of Being a Politician "
    " Father is very proud of me having succeeded him."

    Studying usage of "PROUD", I looked up "PROUD" in Longman, Oxford, Collins, Cambridge dictionaries on web, They dictionaries don't explain about "proud of -ing" .

    But On web, I can find and see lots of sentences of the pattern "proud of -ing" like former 4 expressions.

    Can "Proud of" have "-ing" ?
    Please, Answer to my questions. Thank you.

  2. #2

    Re: "be proud of" Gerund

    " I am proud of him."
    " I'm proud he is a Marine "
    " I'm proud to be be rich."
    " I am Proud to be a Politician "
    " Father is very proud that I succeeded him."

    Does this help?


    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #3

    Re: "be proud of" Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered.YoungPadawan View Post
    I'm here the first time. I have been studying english as a foreign language . I must confess that I cannot speak english as well as 3-year-old native speaker. I'm a starter.
    I would appreciate it if you would answer to my questions.

    My question is :
    Are these correct english?
    " I'm proud of him being a Marine "
    " I'm proud of being rich."
    " Proud of Being a Politician "
    " Father is very proud of me having succeeded him."

    Studying usage of "PROUD", I looked up "PROUD" in Longman, Oxford, Collins, Cambridge dictionaries on web, They dictionaries don't explain about "proud of -ing" .

    But On web, I can find and see lots of sentences of the pattern "proud of -ing" like former 4 expressions.

    Can "Proud of" have "-ing" ?
    Please, Answer to my questions. Thank you.
    _________________________________

    Note: I am not an English teacher but I like studying the English language.

    "I'm proud of him being a Marine"
    I believe this should be: "I'm proud of his being a Marine."
    We'd say, "I'm proud of his behavior." We wouldn't say, "I'm proud of him behavior."

    "I'm proud of being rich." & "Proud of B(b)eing a P(p)olitician."
    These are both correct English sentences.

    "Father is very proud of me having succeeded him."
    I believe this should be: "Father is very proud of my having succeeded him." (or)
    "Father is very proud of my succeeding him." (which is something I have accomplished.)
    "Father is very proud of me" is fine. (as a person or son)

    Except for the changes I've noted above, your sentences are written correctly.

    I hope this helps. Good luck to you.

    Bernzel


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    #4

    Re: "be proud of" Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernzel View Post
    _________________________________

    Note: I am not an English teacher but I like studying the English language.

    "I'm proud of him being a Marine"
    I believe this should be: "I'm proud of his being a Marine."
    We'd say, "I'm proud of his behavior." We wouldn't say, "I'm proud of him behavior."

    "I'm proud of being rich." & "Proud of B(b)eing a P(p)olitician."
    These are both correct English sentences.

    "Father is very proud of me having succeeded him."
    I believe this should be: "Father is very proud of my having succeeded him." (or)
    "Father is very proud of my succeeding him." (which is something I have accomplished.)
    "Father is very proud of me" is fine. (as a person or son)

    Except for the changes I've noted above, your sentences are written correctly.

    I hope this helps. Good luck to you.

    Bernzel
    Actually, both possibilities exist:
    "I'm proud of him/his being a Marine"
    "Father is very proud of me/my having succeeded him."

    I think, depending on certain considerations, it is better to use one rather than the other; but, to my knowledge, linguists have not yet researched this.

  3. banderas's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,512
    #5

    Re: "be proud of" Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post

    depending on certain considerations, it is better to use one rather than the other.
    Hi Naomi, what exactly did you mean by that? Which form do you prefer?


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    #6

    Re: "be proud of" Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    Hi Naomi, what exactly did you mean by that? Which form do you prefer?
    Hi Banderas,

    Nice to run into you on the forum again!

    Grammarians* say that with this structure the possessive form of the pronoun (my/his etc) is more formal than the accusative one (me/him etc), the latter being more common in informal English; so you’d be safe using either.

    I tend to think though that there’s more to it than that.

    It could be that:

    A(i) If the action has already started, or has already taken place before or has been mentioned in the earlier context, then the possessive form would be preferable:
    Do you mind my smoking? (the person has already lit up a cigarette)
    I hope you didn’t mind my cancelling our dinner date but I wasn’t feeling very well. (the action has already taken place)
    I think it would be better if we put your suitcase under the stairs. Would you object to my putting it there? (mentioned just before)

    (ii) Otherwise, the accusative form (for something that has not yet happened or has not yet been mentioned): Would you object to me smoking?
    He’s welcome to come and stay but I won’t have him disrupting my routine.

    B(i) If you’re focussing on the person (rather than the action), you have the accusative form:
    Have you seen John lately? – No. I saw him crossing the street about a month ago; but otherwise I haven’t seen him for ages.

    (ii) If you’re focussing on the action (rather than the person), you have the possessive form: Tom suggests our having a meeting.

    Obviously, these hypotheses would have to be verified. In the meantime (and at least for A), nobody’s going to challenge you if you use one form rather than the other.

    (Incidentally, an interesting fact emerges from such comparisons: with the possessive form of the pronoun (my, his etc) the V+ing structure is a gerund; with the accusative form (me, him etc) the V+ing structure is a present participle.)

    Take care!

    *A.J.Thomson and A.V. Martinet, “A Practical English Grammar”, Fourth Edition, rubric 262 and 263
    “Practical English Usage”, Michael Swan, OUP 1988, rubric 333

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