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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #1

    where

    Hi,

    I was wondering if someone could take look for me at sentence, "She worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore."
    Fisrt, I will get this sentence in this way, "She worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point in which (where) she couldn't handle the instruments anymore."
    And then, I was stuck here by "in which(where)", I mean, "in which" here refers to "in the lab", or "in the point" ? I mean, does this student mean "She worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point, she couldn't handle the instruments anymore in the lab", or "She worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point, in this point/the point is, she couldn't handle the instruments anymore." ? Which one is right?

    Thanks for your help.


    Professor: RSI - repetitive strain injury - is probably the fastest-growing job-related illness. We hear about RSI so much today because high-speed keyboard technology. ... ... This type of injury, RSI, it's been a problem for a long time violinists, typists, mechanics, construction workers - anyone whose job involves repeated wrist movements.
    Student: My mother used to work in the lab at St.Peter's, and she got something like that. She worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore. You could hear her fingers crack and pop when she moved them.
    Professor: Mmm, your mother may have had RSI - a serious case from the sound of it. ... ...

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    #2

    Re: where

    God Bless!


    As you said, "where/in which" refers to "the point".

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    #3

    Re: where

    Quote Originally Posted by xinlai-ue View Post
    hi,

    i was wondering if someone could take look for me at sentence, "she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore."
    fisrt, i will get this sentence in this way, "she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point in which (at which) it's a point in time. You have to imagine time as being on a line - a time line. On the line, you can imagine this: She works there for about 15 years. Then there is a point on the the time line at which something occurs - she cannot handle the instruments any more. Shortly after, you'll probably notice another point on the line at which she either quits the job or is sacked.
    Do you understand up to this point?


    (where) she couldn't handle the instruments anymore."

    and then, i was stuck here by "in which(where)", i mean, "in which" here refers to "in the lab", or "in the point" ?
    well, you introduced "in which". Why ask what it means?
    you might be confused by the use of "where" (which is usually an indicator of place) to refer to a time (which normally uses "when"). If so, you just need to imagine that time as a place (a point) on the time line.
    "at which" refers to the point on the time line at which she can no longer handle the instruments.

    i mean, does this student mean "she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point, she couldn't handle the instruments anymore in the lab", or "she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point, in this point/the point is, she couldn't handle the instruments anymore." ? Which one is right?

    sorry, i can't understand the distinction you're making.
    thanks for your help.


    professor: Rsi - repetitive strain injury - is probably the fastest-growing job-related illness. We hear about rsi so much today because high-speed keyboard technology. ... ... This type of injury, rsi, it's been a problem for a long time violinists, typists, mechanics, construction workers - anyone whose job involves repeated wrist movements.
    Student: My mother used to work in the lab at st.peter's, and she got something like that. she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore. you could hear her fingers crack and pop when she moved them.
    Professor: Mmm, your mother may have had rsi - a serious case from the sound of it. ... ...
    r.


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    #4

    Re: where

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    r.
    Raymott, yes, I am confused by use of "where" in this case.

    Okay, the original sentence: "she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore."

    According to your explanation, I should get this sentence in this way, "she worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point at which she couldn't handle the instruments anymore."

    You said the point refers to the time, it is the point on the time line. Okay, I get it. But I can understand what this means - "and it got to the point". What does "got to" mean ? May I get it in this way, "she worked there for around 15 years - and when it comes to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore." ?

    Last edited by XINLAI-UE; 14-Nov-2008 at 13:46.


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    #5

    Re: where

    My mother used to work in the lab at St.Peter's, and she got something like that. She worked there for around 15 years - and it got to the point where she couldn't handle the instruments anymore.

    "It got to the point where" >> "it got to" = reached

    In this phrase "it" is a place-holder pronoun in a sentence which has no identifiable actor.


    An alternative way of saying this sentence might be:
    After fifteen years, her hands were so damaged by the work that she could not handle the instruments any more.



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    #6

    Re: where

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    r.

    Oh, oh, yes, I get it, Raymott, you already told me clearly, "You have to imagine time as being on a line - a time line. On the line, you can imagine this: She works there for about 15 years. Then there is a point on the the time line at which something occurs - she cannot handle the instruments any more."

    So, as Anglika said, "and it got to the point" means "and it reach/arrive at the point".

    Thank you, Raymott and Anglika. I am not confused about this one anymore.

    Nice day.


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    #7

    Re: where

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    r.
    Raymott, I need you help.

    I ran into a problem about "where" again in another context. It seems I am likely to be stuck by "where" right now.

    Professor:... ... Now a number of colleges and universities offer five-year master's degree programs offering an accelerated, intensive program of study. Some schools - particularly the state technical schools - have five- or six-year cooperative programs where students coordinate classroom study with practical work experience. These programs are popular because, in addition to gaining useful job experience, students can finance part of their education.

    Okay, fisrt, I will get it in this way, "Some schools - particularly the state technical schools - have five- or six-year cooperative programs at which (where) students coordinate classroom study with practical work experience."

    As you said, "where" (which is usually an indicator of place) to refer to a time (which normally uses "when").
    Then I have a question, "which" in this context refers to "the programs", or "the state technical schools" ?

    Thanks for your help.

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    #8

    Re: where

    Quote Originally Posted by XINLAI-UE View Post
    Raymott, I need you help.

    I ran into a problem about "where" again in another context. It seems I am likely to be stuck by "where" right now.

    Professor:... ... Now a number of colleges and universities offer five-year master's degree programs offering an accelerated, intensive program of study. Some schools - particularly the state technical schools - have five- or six-year cooperative programs where students coordinate classroom study with practical work experience. These programs are popular because, in addition to gaining useful job experience, students can finance part of their education.

    Okay, fisrt, I will get it in this way, "Some schools - particularly the state technical schools - have five- or six-year cooperative programs at which (where) students coordinate classroom study with practical work experience."

    As you said, "where" (which is usually an indicator of place) to refer to a time (which normally uses "when").
    Then I have a question, "which" in this context refers to "the programs", or "the state technical schools" ?

    Thanks for your help.
    It means "the programs". "Where" is often used like this, not indicating a place. Here you can read it as "during which". During the 6-year program, students alternate study and work.

    Here are some more examples of where "where" doesn't refer to a physical location:
    The previous sentence and this one, where it means "in which".
    "I like replying to questions where (to which) the answer is easy".
    "This is the scene of the play where (during which) she dies".
    "Some things happen where (for which) there's no reason". (Not a good sentence, but people say things like this).

    If "where" doesn't seem to mean "at which location", try substituting other prepositions before "which" - at, in, by, for, during ....


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    #9

    Re: where

    [quote=Raymott;385712]It means "the programs". "Where" is often used like this, not indicating a place. Here you can read it as "during which". During the 6-year program, students alternate study and work.
    quote]

    Thanks, Raymott. I think I will not be confused by "where" anymore since I have got your useful tip !

    If you are able to teach as an English teacher in my school, I guess that would be a BIG surprise to all my classmates and me.

    Don't "worried", I just can not help saying you are a good teacher. It is sincere.

    And, okay, next time I will learn to refrain!

    Support for Raymott !!!

    X.

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    #10

    Re: where

    You're welcome.

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