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    #1

    has yet to write / has not written

    1. Although a prolific writer, Yancy has yet to write a book that isn't well worth reading.
    2. Although a prolific writer, Yancy has not written a book that isn't well worth reading.
    What's the difference in meaning between the above two sentences?

  1. #2

    Re: has yet to write / has not written

    (Not a teacher)

    Stifan,

    Both of the boldface expressions signify the same thing, but the meaning of the two sentences is confused by the use of the conjunction "although." Was the actual intention to say, "Although a prolific writer, Yancy has not written a book/yet to write a book that IS worth reading?"

    If you wish to indicate how good an author Yancy is, then "although" should be dropped:

    A prolific writer, Yancy has not written a book that isn't well worth reading. Or:

    Yancy, a prolific writer, has yet to write a book that isn't well worth reading.
    Last edited by Greg Forbes; 15-Nov-2008 at 07:16. Reason: add word

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