Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #1

    Smile how to say that?

    Hello, dear teachers and friends,

    I am trying to find a verb and/or a prhasal verb to describe the case when somebody does lots of favor for you, then you can tell her/him how greatful you are, then you say:

    Please, let me buy you a new car.

    Please, let me .... you by buying a new car.

    this person is trying to keep the favors even, so, what the phrasal verb able to replace the dots? It's something related to rewarding.

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Re: how to say that?

    (Not a teacher)

    If you mean you'd like to repay him, the verb "reciprocate" is a nice one:

    Please let me reciprocate by buying you a new car.

    The phrasal verb "pay back" means about the same thing:

    Please let me pay you back by buying you a new car.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 2,130
    #3

    Re: how to say that?

    How about

    I would like to express my gratitude by buying ...


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: how to say that?

    I would agree with tedtmc

    'reciprocate' has the sense of 'to return in kind or degree' and implies a mutual or equivalent exchange or a paying back of what one has received e.g. reciprocate someone's hospitality by inviting them for a visit.

    In this sentence, we have someone buying a car in gratitude for a series of favours. It may be in proportion to the sense of gratitude felt, but a new car versus a few favours is too out of proportion to be called 'reciprocating'.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #5

    Smile Re: how to say that?

    Thank you guys, but I think I found the phrasal verb I was looking for, it's 'to make up', I am not sure if it fits in that context, I looked it up on a web dictionary, it has lots of meanings, but one of them is 'to compensate', which means you are trying to keep things even.

    Let me make you up for helping me out today.
    You have done too much for me, I will make you up as soon as I can.

    Are those sentences OK?

    Many thanks!


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #6

    Re: how to say that?

    Careful there. If I was injured in a traffic accident, the insurance company would give me money to compensate me for the injuries I received, pain and suffering. The insurance company is not 'reciprocating'.

    Similarly, 'make up for' is not appropriate for your context.
    make up for: 'serve or act to compensate for something lost, missed, or deficient' : A worker needing to go home early one day may say to his boss: "I'll make up the time tomorrow."
    A boyfriend who had to cancel a date might send his girlfriend some flowers the next day, and take his girlfriend out to a very expensive restaurant next time, to 'make up for' having let her down the previous time.

    make it up to: 'compensate someone for negligent or unfair treatment'

    None of these instances mean 'reciprocate'
    Last edited by David L.; 17-Nov-2008 at 04:18.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •