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    #1

    "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    1) If you should get one million dollars, what would you do?
    2) If you were to get one million dollars, what would you do?

    Is there any difference in meaning between the above sentences?
    Last edited by sitifan; 16-Nov-2008 at 04:44.

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    #2

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    I don't think there is any difference in the meanings, although I'm not sure if one is more correct than the other. I suspect the should version is simply more formal, but I prefer the were to version personally. But then, I am American-bred and have a natural aversion to anything even remotely connected to the pretentious "shall."

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    #3

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    1) If you should get one million dollars, what would you do?
    2) If you were to get one million dollars, what would you do?

    Is there any difference in meaning between the above sentences?
    I also don't think there's a difference, except that very few people would say 1. 2 is much more common and normal.

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    #4

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    1 is used more in formal context I think.

    'Should' is also used this way: 'should you get....' to mean 'if you get'.

    not a teacher

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    #5

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"


    I'm afraid you'll have to do better than that, tedtmc.
    I beg your pardon, sitifan?

    I was merely stating another way 'should' is used. Anything wrong with that?

    should (POSSIBILITY) Show phonetics
    modal verb
    1 FORMAL used when referring to a possible event in the future:
    If anyone should ask for me, I'll be in the manager's office.
    Should you (= If you) ever need anything, please don't hesitate to contact me.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...3138&dict=CALD
    not a teacher

  2. #6

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    Should you get is a probability.'He were 'is improbable.

    Ram100.

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    #7

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    1) If you came here tomorrow, I would give you my dictionary.
    2) If you were to come here tomorrow, I would give you my dictionary.
    3) If you should come here tomorrow, I would give you my dictionary.
    What's the difference in meaning between #1 and #2 or #3?
    _________________
    Thank you very much for your reply.

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    #8

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    No difference. All are conditionals. All are correct. All mean the same thing.

    Many people would think that #1 is wrong, but the conditional uses the past tense. If you come here tomorrow suggests that it is entirely possible; if you came here tomorrow suggests that it is entirely unlikely that you will.

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    #9

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    I was taught that should you is a literary equivalent of if you should, not if you.
    Well, that is not just what I said, it is taken from the Cambridge online dictionary.

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    #10

    Re: "If S were to" vs. "If S should"

    Last edited by sitifan; 19-Nov-2008 at 10:42.

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