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    #1

    Cool unusual use of "see sb. doing sth"!

    I was translating this article about migraine, there was this sentence says"most people experience one-sided head pain that sees them heading for a darkend room" and I got stuck. based on my understanding of migraine, i translated it as "they feel they need to be heading for a darkened room because of the head pain", but my friend thinks it means "the head pain makes them feel like they are heading for a darkened room". I am confused how can "head pain" see somebody doing something? anybody please explain it? Thanks~~~


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: unusual use of "see sb. doing sth"!

    People suffering a migraine attack are sensitive to light, which intensifies the experience of the pain, and prefer to be in a darkened room until the attack is over.
    (A bit like loud noise if you have a headache or a hangover.)

    So - when you're not feeling well, you want to lie down - you head for bed. With a migraine, they go to a room where they can draw the curtains and have all the lights off - they 'head for a darkened room'.
    (This takes a little literary licence, since 'to head for' seems to imply 'a darkened room' is there, all ready prepared, as if routinely found in a home along with a kitchen, lounge and bathroom..."That's the master bedroom, and next to it is the darkened room, and then the upstairs toilet..." It is any quiet room in the house then made as dark as possible until the migraine goes.)
    Last edited by David L.; 15-Nov-2008 at 09:32.


    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Cool Re: unusual use of "see sb. doing sth"!

    thank you for the explanation! well, I think I understand what migrain is (I am actually having one now -_-), what I don't get is the use of the structure "see sb. doing sth." here. To me, this sentence "the pain see them heading for a darkened room" seems to suggest "the pain makes them feel like they are in the room" rather than "the pain makes them want to go to a darkened room". Can I also say:the question see me looking for an answer?


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: unusual use of "see sb. doing sth"!

    Oh. I thought your query was the difference of opinion with your friend - was the darkened room real, or in the mind!.

    You are probably aware that 'see' has many meanings other than purely to do withe the eyes, as in, "Let me see you to the door."

    One of these is 'to give rise to or be characterized by:
    "His term in office saw the introduction of many reforms."
    "Prohibition saw the era of the 'speak-easy'"

    In your sentence:
    "most people experience one-sided head pain that sees them heading for a darkend room"
    means that the onset of pain is invariably followed by/characterized by their seeking out a darkened room.

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