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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #1

    Due to

    Good evening from the Philippines. Some English professors consider this phrase wrong: Due to circumstances beyond our control...

    If so, may I please know the reason why it is wrong? And how should it be rephrased to make it correct?

    Many, many thanks again!

  1. banderas's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by daddyjohn View Post
    Good evening from the Philippines. Some English professors consider this phrase wrong: Due to circumstances beyond our control...

    If so, may I please know the reason why it is wrong? And how should it be rephrased to make it correct?

    Many, many thanks again!
    Hi, does that English professor say that due to means "caused by" and claim that "because of" should be used instead?

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    #3

    Re: Due to

    I think it is not so much that the phrase is wrong as being redundant in most cases - a kind of convenient 'escape phrase' to explain away something which has failed.

    not a teacher

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Due to

    A: Due to circumstances beyond our control....
    B: You shouldn't say due to.
    A: Why not?
    B: Because I say so.
    A: Not a good enough reason. I am going to continue saying due to.








    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #5

    Re: Due to

    Of course, owing to and because of are the other two options. The Longman dictionary has this to say about due to:
    "Some people think due to should only be used after the verb to be, but many people use it with other verbs as well."
    Maybe your professors belong to the group of people who object to its being used with other verbs.


    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 4
    #6

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by daddyjohn View Post
    Good evening from the Philippines. Some English professors consider this phrase wrong: Due to circumstances beyond our control...

    If so, may I please know the reason why it is wrong? And how should it be rephrased to make it correct?

    Many, many thanks again!
    Due to the circumstances beyond our control, ...
    but some say it is not acceptable to use due to at the beginning of a sentence although it is common and not cause any trouble. They, I mean the professors, must be expecting because of ... or owing to instead of due to or you may be supposed to place due to at the end of your sentence :)

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Due to

    Feel free to use "due to" at the beginning of a sentence.


  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Due to

    Hair loss may be due to stress.

    Due to circumstances beyond our control, we had to postpone the meeting.




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