Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 3,973
    #1

    Ice Queen and Her Majesty

    Ice Queen: Her Majesty opens a hockey match between Slovakian team Poprad and a British team from Guildford
    Crowning glory: How the Queen transformed into a glam granny for her latest royal tour | Mail Online

    I think the phrase - Ice Queen has negative connotation in English slang. I wonder why it is okay that the English media outlet- the Daily Mail used it to describe their Queen.

    There was a well-known Hong Kong comedian whose nickname is "Happy Fruit" if translated literally. But a Chinese-Canadian, I mean English is not his first language though he masters it very well, told me that I cannot use "fruit" because "fruit" refers a homosexual in English slang. In the Chinese language, fruit doesn't imply any negative connotations. And I once used "cheers up, chin up to encourage a person, the guy let me drop "chin up" because chin up refers to perform fellatio on a man in English slang.

    I mean native speakers even use words which a contain negative connotation to describe the Queen though they don't mean that at all. But why was I told "Happy Fruit" is not right?
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 18-Nov-2008 at 04:33.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #2

    Re: Ice Queen and Her Majesty

    There was nothing negative in "Ice Queen" in that reference.

    Almost anything you say can be offensive if said in a mean spirit, or simply jovial if said with affection.

    Yes, "fruit" can refer to a gay man, but we still sell and eat Froot Loops cereal and wear Fruit of the Loom underwear - you can be sure that the marketing departments would have changed these names pretty quickly if the felt their were negative connotations. Look how quickly they got the Fried out of KFC! No one wants fried food any more! It's the same chicken, of course, but they don't want to remind us of it in letters six feet tall!

    It's what makes for humor, and what makes humor so difficult to translate. One my favourite lines from Thin Blue Line, starring Rowan Atkinson (a.k.a. Mr Bean), was when his undercover detective said, "It's my arse on the line and I don't want a cock-up!"
    It's just two standard idioms (arse on the line = my reputation is at stake; cock-up = a botched job) tied together with sexual innuendo.

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 3,973
    #3

    Re: Ice Queen and Her Majesty

    Hello Jlinger,

    Thank you for your answer and interesting anecdotes.

    Look how quickly they got the Fried out of KFC! No one wants fried food any more!
    Does it refer to getting sacked?

    It's the same chicken, of course, but they don't want to remind us of it in letters six feet tall!
    Why is "chicken" relevant to "six feet tall"

    Thanks!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #4

    Re: Ice Queen and Her Majesty

    I am glad you like my divergent stories.

    I said "fried" not "fired." The old name of Col. Sanders's chicken hut was "Kentucky Fried Chicken." In the 60s that conjured up a good taste in your mind. By the 90s, when everyone was against fried foods, it was dragging the company down. They changed their name to KFC.

    The reference to letters six feet tall was to the signs on the highway inviting you to come to KFC. Large signs, large letters. I might have said, "It's the same fried chicken, but they don't want to advertise it in letters six feet tall."

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 3,973
    #5

    Re: Ice Queen and Her Majesty

    Hi Jlinger,

    Thank you for your explanations. I've understood. I prefer calling you Jlinger, which sounds cool, if you don't mind.

    Have a good day there.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •