Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 732
    #1

    one's vs. his or her

    Hello everyone

    I'd like to ask if "one's" can be used in the following sentence instead of "his or her":

    International standards state that restrictions imposed on freedom of information to protect the right of a person to one’s image can be applied to an image of a person so that it’s not used in purely commercial purposes.
    Last edited by KLPNO; 18-Nov-2008 at 15:21.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #2

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Yes.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 732
    #3

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    Yes.
    Thank you very much, jlinger.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    #4

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Quote Originally Posted by KLPNO View Post
    Hello everyone

    I'd like to ask if "one's" can be used in the following sentence instead of "his or her":

    International standards state that restrictions imposed on freedom of information to protect the right of a person to one’s image can be applied to an image of a person so that it’s not used in purely commercial purposes.
    Sorry to disagree but in fact, no, you couldn’t substitute one’s for his or her here. One is only used to talk about people in general, and is not used to refer to an individual*. In your sentence, the personal pronoun refers back to an individual, “a person”.

    *“Practical English Usage”, Michael Swan, OUP 1988, rubric 440

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 732
    #5

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post
    Sorry to disagree but in fact, no, you couldn’t substitute one’s for his or her here. One is only used to talk about people in general, and is not used to refer to an individual*. In your sentence, the personal pronoun refers back to an individual, “a person”.

    *“Practical English Usage”, Michael Swan, OUP 1988, rubric 440
    Thank you very much, naomimalan.

  1. Dawood Usmani's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 603
    #6

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Quote Originally Posted by KLPNO View Post
    Thank you very much, naomimalan.
    Naomimalan is right.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #7

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    I neither understand or accept that, Naomi.

    Contrary to popular opinion, I can be taught, however.

    So teach me why, again? Your explanation is not too clear. The reference above was to people / persons in general, not to one person specifically.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    #8

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    I neither understand or accept that, Naomi.

    Contrary to popular opinion, I can be taught, however.

    So teach me why, again? Your explanation is not too clear. The reference above was to people / persons in general, not to one person specifically.
    I agree, Swan’s explanation may not be that clear for a sentence like the one KLPNO gives.

    The grammarians, Thomson and Martinet*, both authorities, give and exemplify a rule that is easier to understand, I think:

    “If instead of one or you we use a singular noun, the possessive adjective will obviously be his or her:

    One must do one’s best.
    A traveller has to guard his possessions.” (note his, not one’s)

    In the second sentence, the singular noun is a traveller but a traveller here does not refer to one person specifically.

    I think what T and M are saying is:

    If your subject is one, you can (or must) follow on with one: One must do one’s best

    But if your subject is a singular noun you have to follow on with his or her: A traveller has to guard his possessions

    In. KLPNO’s sentence, the subject is a singular noun (“a person”) so you have to follow on with his or her.

    Hope T and M's explanation is clearer.


    *A.J.Thomson and A.V. Martinet, “A Practical English Grammar”, Fourth Edition, rubric 68 you, one and they as indefinite pronouns

  2. Dawood Usmani's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 603
    #9

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post
    I agree, Swan’s explanation may not be that clear for a sentence like the one KLPNO gives.

    The grammarians, Thomson and Martinet*, both authorities, give and exemplify a rule that is easier to understand, I think:

    “If instead of one or you we use a singular noun, the possessive adjective will obviously be his or her:

    One must do one’s best.
    A traveller has to guard his possessions.” (note his, not one’s)

    In the second sentence, the singular noun is a traveller but a traveller here does not refer to one person specifically.

    I think what T and M are saying is:

    If your subject is one, you can (or must) follow on with one: One must do one’s best

    But if your subject is a singular noun you have to follow on with his or her: A traveller has to guard his possessions

    In. KLPNO’s sentence, the subject is a singular noun (“a person”) so you have to follow on with his or her.

    Hope T and M's explanation is clearer.


    *A.J.Thomson and A.V. Martinet, “A Practical English Grammar”, Fourth Edition, rubric 68 you, one and they as indefinite pronouns
    GOOD explanation. Keep it up!
    Dawood

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #10

    Re: one's vs. his or her

    Thank you!

    You see, one can learn if one keeps one's mind open!

    In fact, it has now earned an entry in my on-line collection of such: http://www.stage-door.org/stampact/traps.html
    Last edited by jlinger; 19-Nov-2008 at 13:08.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •