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    #1

    spare

    Here's a sentence by my friend:
    Every day i exercise to spare my waist becoming a spare tire.
    Is it good English?

    Thank you very much.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: spare

    Maybe, in Am English. In Br English it's 'tyre'.

    Also, the first 'spare' is not well chosen. If you spare something from doing something, you relieve it of the necessity. You could only 'spare your waist...' from doing something, if you meant to imply* that it had to do it and you spared it the duty: 'I'm passing that way anyway, so you could give me the parcel and I'll drop it in - it'll spare you the effort.'

    How about 'so as to avoid getting a spare tyre' [that is, don't mention your waist at all]?

    b

    *Edited, to make sense. Sorry if the earlier version had anyone foxed.
    Last edited by BobK; 19-Nov-2008 at 13:46. Reason: Added footnote

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    #3

    Re: spare

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Maybe, in Am English. In Br English it's 'tyre'.

    Also, the first 'spare' is not well chosen. If you spare something from doing something, you relieve it of the necessity. You could only 'spare your waist...' from doing something, you're implying that it had to do it and you spared it the duty: 'I'm passing that way anyway, so you could give me the parcel and I'll drop it in - it'll spare you the effort.'

    How about 'so as to avoid getting a spare tyre' [that is, don't mention your waist at all]?

    b
    Hi,Bobk.Thank you so much.
    Another question:
    If we had to say"to spare sth/sb from doing sth",can we drop "from"?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: spare

    Quote Originally Posted by norwolf View Post
    Hi,Bobk.Thank you so much.
    Another question:
    If we had to say"to spare sth/sb from doing sth",can we drop "from"?
    Yes you can, and you can sometimes go one step further:
    Spare him from making the effort =>Spare him making the effort> Spare him the effort.


    (You can't do this with all verbs, just when a noun - like "effort" or "practice" or "journey"... - implies some kind of <verb>-ing.)

    And apologies for my hastily-written nonsense. I meant to say "You could only 'spare your waist...' from doing something, IF YOU MEANT TO IMPLY that it had to do it and you spared it the duty..." (It's hard enough for students when teachers talk sense! I'll go and edit it now.)

    b

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