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    #1

    french goodbye

    Please, could you advice what " french goodbye" means?

  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: french goodbye

    Quote Originally Posted by Amal Osama View Post
    Please, could you advice what " french goodbye" means?
    [not a teacher.]

    Could you please offer the context? Thanks!

    It could be a song, goodbye in French, etc.

  2. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: french goodbye

    If you could bring more context, I would tell

    That being said, I assume the following without any context as this is a tradition:

    The French attitude for the foreigners and rather a way of life for us here.

    We kiss each other on both cheeks when we meet or we leave people.

    However, bear in mind that only Woman and Man or Woman and Woman kiss each other on the cheeks. Men may kiss each other on the cheeks, when it is with either the family or great great friends.

    According to where you reside, there are different traditions. Eg especially about the number of kisses given - so you can kiss one time the both cheeks somewhere whereas it can be more elsewhere


    Not a teacher, but a French
    Last edited by philadelphia; 19-Nov-2008 at 02:26.


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    #4

    Re: french goodbye

    Thank you all for your help. A friend; actually a lover told me this by the end of a phone call. I guess that "french" is usually related to love....
    Does it have anything to do with " french leave"?

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    #5

    Re: french goodbye

    It sounds to me like a sort of passionate goodbye, kind goodbye, love goodbye - (this is to keep in touch with the person). Therefore, yes, I agree with you on the fact that French is often considered as Love or at least a lovely language


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    #6

    Re: french goodbye

    Thanks Philadeliphia. You've been of a great help. In other words, you said what I wanna hear

  4. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: french goodbye

    All the pleasure was mine. And welcome to the forums, new folk

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    #8

    Re: french goodbye

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi Amal Osama,

    There are a few words concerning the matter in question:

    French leave = An abrupt and unannounced departure (without saying farewell) ; An informal, unannounced, or abrupt departure.

    French leave refers to the act of leaving a party without bidding farewell to the host. The intent behind this behaviour is to leave without disturbing the host. The phrase was born at a time when the English and French cultures were heavily interlinked

    The term is also used to mean the act of leisurely desertion from a military unit or to go away or do a thing without permission. This comes from the rich history of Franco-English conflict, and has a perfect French equivalent in "filer l'anglaise" (to take the English leave).

    The actual derivation may have its roots in American history during the French and Indian wars. About 140 French soldiers were captured near Lake George in New York and ferried to an island in the lake. The French, knowing the area better than the British, waited until near dawn and quietly waded ashore leaving their captors bewildered on arising. Though its role as such didn't last a day, the island has been named Prison Island.

    In Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson, the main character, Jim, refers to taking "a French leave" when he leaves the shelter unbeknownst to the captain.

    Regards,

    V.

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