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    #1

    slouch and stoop

    Hi!teachers:
    I am wondering if the two words are the same meaning.
    I would like to say : He slouches.May I also say :He stoops.
    Is it interchangeable?
    Thanks a lot!

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    #2

    Re: slouch and stoop

    No.

    To slouch is to slide down in your chair. The teacher is asking a question - you don't know the answer - the teacher is looking in your direction - you slouch, hoping to disappear through the seat of your desk.

    To stoop is to bend over, or down. He stooped to pick up the paper from the floor. A person who is bent by old age is referred to as "stooped" (and don't use the old fashioned pronunciation of Stoo-ped unless you are out of earshot or you may come in contact with the stooped person's cane).

    {Thx Wuken, for catching my typo}
    Last edited by jlinger; 19-Nov-2008 at 12:56.

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    #3

    Re: slouch and stoop

    I’m not a teacher but as the story goes I like to read books which are covered with dust.

    Hi Wuken,

    There are a few words concerning the matter in question:

    slouch (n) = lazy man," variant of slouk (1570), perhaps from O.N. slokr "lazy fellow," and related to slack on the notion of "sagging, drooping." Meaning "stooping of the head and shoulders" first recorded 1725.

    Main Entry: slouch Part of Speech: verb Synonyms: bend, droop, gait, hunch, idle, idler, laggard, lounge, posture, slacker, stoop, wilt

    Sourse Dictionary.com slouch synonym | Thesaurus.com

    Slouch (v) = droop, loll, shamble, shuffle, slump, stoop

    Source Chambers Thesarius

    Regards,

    V.


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    #4

    Re: slouch and stoop

    to 'slouch' is to stand, move, or sit in a lazy, drooping(=bend or hang downward limply) way

    to 'stoop' is to bend one's head or body forward and downward, and may refer to a habitual way of walking.

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    #5

    Re: slouch and stoop

    Thanks for all of your answers.
    Let's say a girl who has big chest didn't want people to notice her big chest so she stooped(or slouch?).
    when her mother saw her daughter's poor gesture, she said"Don't slouch, stand straight."
    or "Don't stoop , stand straight."
    (I guess the word I should use is slouch in the sentence.is it right?)

    Could you please relpy it for me?
    Thanks a lot!

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    #6

    Re: slouch and stoop

    I am quite sure the mother would say "slouch" in this instance. Slouching is more voluntary, stooping (in posture, rather than just reaching down to get something) is more permanent.

    It reminds me of VP-elect Biden's gaffe in a rally, when he was lauding the civil service of Missouri State Senator Chuck Graham, who he knew was in the audience. Everyone started applauding and Biden called out to him, "Come on Chuck, stand up and take a bow!"

    Bill was confined to a wheelchair.

    To tell someone not to stoop is to command them to do something that is physically impossible.

    BTW, did you know that "stoop" [n] is also a synonym for "porch"?

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    #7

    Re: slouch and stoop

    did you know that "stoop" [n] is also a synonym for "porch"?
    [/quote]
    No, I don't know.
    Also I wonder if hunch is a synonym for stoop.
    Thank jlinger very much.You makes me learn more and unterstand more.Thanks a lot!

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    I am quite sure the mother would say "slouch" in this instance. Slouching is more voluntary, stooping (in posture, rather than just reaching down to get something) is more permanent.

    It reminds me of VP-elect Biden's gaffe in a rally, when he was lauding the civil service of Missouri State Senator Chuck Graham, who he knew was in the audience. Everyone started applauding and Biden called out to him, "Come on Chuck, stand up and take a bow!"

    Bill was confined to a wheelchair.

    To tell someone not to stoop is to command them to do something that is physically impossible.

    BTW, did you know that "stoop" [n] is also a synonym for "porch"?

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    #8

    Re: slouch and stoop

    No, I don't think hunch and stoop are synonyms.


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    #9

    Re: slouch and stoop

    Slouching is more voluntary, stooping (in posture, rather than just reaching down to get something) is more permanent.

    Not in Brit. Eng. Either can be temporary, or habitual posture.

    Also, 'stoop' = 'porch' is very much Amer. Eng.

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    #10

    Re: slouch and stoop

    Hi Wuken,

    There are some more references concerning the matter in question as well as a few model sentenses of the widely known British National Corpus.

    stoop (n) = originally, a covered porch with seats, at a house door; the Dutch stoep as introduced by the Dutch into New York. Afterward, an out-of-door flight of stairs of from seven to fourteen steps, with platform and parapets, leading to an entrance door some distance above the street; the French perron. Hence, any porch, platform, entrance stairway, or small veranda, at a house door. [U. S.]

    to stoop (v) = to bend the upper part of the body downward and forward; to bend or lean forward; to incline forward in standing or walking; to assume habitually a bent position.

    to bend forward and downward; to bow down; as, to stoop the body

    stoop (n) = slouched posture

    bend o’s back, bend down, stoop, crouch,
    become hunchbacked, humpbacked, humped

    (adj.) hump-backed, crookbacked, crooked, deformed, humped, hunchbacked, hunched, misshapen, stooped
    hunch (v) = arch, bend, crouch, curl up, curve, draw in, huddle, hump, shrug, squat, stoop, tense

    And I, she thought bitterly, I am not young, not a girl, to bend and stoop and struggle with making and tidying this great bed. I am sixty-one.

    Although she was not a tall woman, she had to stoop low to get through the doorway.

    The stoop known as Dowager's Hump is caused by osteoporosis.

    The way in is so low that one has to stoop on entering, but inside the cave there is a large water-floored hall with two recesses off.

    If you stoop or are round-shouldered these shoulder movements will help to rectify this problem area for you.

    It's cos they don't sit in the seat properly, they slouch in them!

    And don't slouch , put your shoulders back, girl!

    You should walk with a brisk step which indicates that you are interested in your job, never slouch along, droop your shoulders or flop awkwardly in a chair; your head should be held high, your shoulders back; you should walk gracefully with good body line, and sit and bend down elegantly.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 19-Nov-2008 at 17:52.

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