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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Morit, Morire, Moris

    Scenario:

    In a cartoon, a boy was fancying himself as a Wizard. Here's the snippet of his monologue.

    I am the Wondrous Wizard of Latin! I am a dervish of declension and a conjurer of conjugation with a million hit points and maximum charisma!

    Ah-ha! Morire: To die! Morit: He, she, or it dies! Moris: You die!

    Questions:

    Q1: hit points =?

    Q2: Morit, Morire, Moris =?

    Thanks!

  2. supada's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    Not a teacher at all but just want to share. : )

    I think 'morire' is an infinitive verb means 'to die' in Italian. 'Morit' and 'Moris' are forms of verb when applied to different genders of subjects.

    Await for teachers. : )

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Scenario:

    In a cartoon, a boy was fancying himself as a Wizard. Here's the snippet of his monologue.

    I am the Wondrous Wizard of Latin! I am a dervish of declension and a conjurer of conjugation with a million hit points and maximum charisma!

    Ah-ha! Morire: To die! Morit: He, she, or it dies! Moris: You die!

    Questions:

    Q1: hit points =?

    Q2: Morit, Morire, Moris =?

    Thanks!
    Here are the simple present conjugations of "to die" in Italian and Latin:
    Morire (to die; Italian)
    io muoio
    tu muori
    lui, lei, Lei muore
    noi moriamo
    voi morete
    loro, Loro muorono

    Morior (to die: Latin)
    I moriō
    you (tu) morīs
    he/she/it morit
    we morī́mus
    you morī́tis
    they moriunt

    The boy gives the infinitive in Italian, and a few conjugations in Latin. They are similar, but not the same. Since these languages have inflections, the pronoun is usually not needed.
    Morior: morio, moris, morit, morimus, moritis, moriunt
    It's much simpler in English:
    to die: (I, you we, they) die; (he/she/it) dies

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    Hi guys,

    Thank you for your help.


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    #5

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    Hi, I happened to see that episode of the Simpsons, too, and I was surprised for the big mistake!

    The verb "morire" is in Italian but the pupil tries to conjugate it in Latin. The infinitive in Latin is "mori"(famous the sentence "memento mori" =>"remember you will die"), a so called "deponent verb", that means that it can only be conjugated in the passive form, which is as follows:

    morior
    moreris
    moritur
    morimur
    morimini
    moriuntur

    The Italian is:
    muio
    muori
    muore
    muoiamo
    morite
    muoiono

    Morit and moris do not exist in Latin! Nor in Italian...

  5. euncu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    It's easy for ones who are familiar with video games that hit points represent the health of the characters in those games. And as for a million hit points, it means you are almost immortal.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    Quote Originally Posted by Micheleg View Post

    The Italian is:
    muio
    muori
    muore
    muoiamo
    morite
    muoiono

    Morit and moris do not exist in Latin! Nor in Italian...
    Interesting. So is my Italian conjugation wrong? I thought there were two variants of the verb.
    I can't remember where I got those from, but here's one source:
    Italian Verbs: Morire

    I think I must have got the Latin from here:
    http://www.allverbs.com/cache/verbta...m/morior.shtml
    I suppose now that the conjugations in faint print are conjugations as they would be if they existed in the active voice?
    Last edited by Raymott; 08-Apr-2010 at 05:53.


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    #8

    Re: Morit, Morire, Moris

    In the link you mentioned the conjugation is right for the first 4 cases, wrong for the last two. I made a mistake, too! "Morire" is an irregular verb in Italian...in the fourth person (we) it's "moriamo", not "muoiamo" as I wrote. (muoio, muori, muore, moriamo, morite, muoiono)

    About the Latin verb "mori", you guessed it right. The faint print refers to the verb "morere", I've never encountered it in 5 years of Latin at school. The only existing form, as far as I know, is the deponent one. In the link you quoted, there's a mistake! The second person is "moreris" and not "moriris".

    In conclusion, there's an error in the episode of the Simpsons, Treehouse of horror VI, season 7...

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