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    #1

    Arrow "Incapacitation"

    He there,

    Does this word - incapacitation - exist in English?

    On my dictionaries I just found "incapacity", "incapacitate", "incapacitating" and "incapable" but nothing of "incapacitation".

    Thank you all!

    Falcon

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    #2

    Re: "Incapacitation"

    yes it does - re: Webster's Ninth Collegiate Dictionary

    "Incapacitation - noun"


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: "Incapacitation"

    Click on Reference in the banner at the top of this page, and go to Browse Dictionaries. You will find reference to the word in 12 dictionaries, with its meaning.

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Arrow Re: "Incapacitation"

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Click on Reference in the banner at the top of this page, and go to Browse Dictionaries. You will find reference to the word in 12 dictionaries, with its meaning.

    Thanks for this tip.

    However I've just found this word on Merrian-Webster Dictionary. For example, I didn't find it on Cambridge Advanced Learner's and Oxford Dictionaries. Does this word it isn't common in English?


    Falcon

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    #5

    Re: "Incapacitation"

    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon View Post

    Thanks for this tip.

    However I've just found this word on Merrian-Webster Dictionary. For example, I didn't find it on Cambridge Advanced Learner's and Oxford Dictionaries. Does this wordMEAN it isn't common in English?

    Falcon
    I wouldn't call it uncommon, its just less common than the other "capa-" words that that dictionary covers. Editors of most dictionaries have limited resources; in a learner's dictionary they have to allocate those resources (space per headword, editorial attention, and so on) to many things - spelling, pronunciation, usage notes, examples... . They have to draw the line somewhere.

    The upshot of this is that it is usually a mistake to put your faith in just one dictionary.

    b

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