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    • Join Date: Jul 2005
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    #1

    correct expressions

    Hi,

    could you please tell me whether the following collocations are correct or whether there are any better alternatives:

    drawing on a loan
    paid in optional installments (meaning that the debtor determines the amount of each installment and the time of payment)
    paid in cash into the hands of/to the attention of (or just paid to sb.???)

    Thanks a lot!

    Hanka

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: correct expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    drawing on a loan
    I don't know that that means.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    paid in optional installments (meaning that the debtor determines the amount of each installment and the time of payment)
    That makes sense.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    paid in cash into the hands of/to the attention of (or just paid to sb.???)
    Try:
    paid in cash to (somebody)

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: correct expressions

    One can't draw on a loan, as Ron said. What you can do with a loan - depending on whether you're the creditor or the debtor - is grant/issue/extend a loan, or take out/apply for a loan. Also, if you're the creditor and want it back, you can recall the loan; there' a similar expression with 'debt' - 'call in a debt'. In an extreme, and topical case, a lender might 'foreclose a mortgage'.

    b


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    #4

    Re: correct expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    One can't draw on a loan, as Ron said. What you can do with a loan - depending on whether you're the creditor or the debtor - is grant/issue/extend a loan, or take out/apply for a loan. Also, if you're the creditor and want it back, you can recall the loan; there' a similar expression with 'debt' - 'call in a debt'. In an extreme, and topical case, a lender might 'foreclose a mortgage'.

    b
    OK, you take out a loan, but how do you call the act of actually obtaining the money. Or the date when you obtain the money (which I thought was a "drawing date")?

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: correct expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    OK, you take out a loan, but how do you call the act of actually obtaining the money. Or the date when you obtain the money (which I thought was a "drawing date")?
    You pick up your money? You deposit your check?



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    #6

    Re: correct expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    You pick up your money? You deposit your check?

    And if I want to use the word "loan"?

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: correct expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Hanka View Post
    And if I want to use the word "loan"?
    As Ron said, you pick it up; or you [with]draw the money. But you don't draw the loan.

    b

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