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  1. Roselin's Avatar
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    #1

    plz reply

    A: I hope they are fine.

    B: Yes, they are fine. Thanks for showing concern.

    What are the other ways by which B can reply ?


    Thanks..

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: plz reply

    Quote Originally Posted by Roselin View Post
    A: I hope they are fine.

    B: Yes, they are fine. Thanks for showing concern.

    What are the other ways by which B can reply ?


    Thanks..
    Often, B would add to the adjective A used, and A would know this; so A would typically start with a less extreme adjective:

    A I hope they are OK?

    B Yes, they're fine. Thanks for asking.

    If B just matches the adjective, he could be going on to express reservations:

    A I hope they are OK.

    B Yes, OK.... [But they've been a lot better.]


    So your version sounds a bit odd to me; if they're fine, they're fine - what else can be wrong?

    b

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: plz reply

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Often, B would add to the adjective A used, and A would know this; so A would typically start with a less extreme adjective:

    A I hope they are OK?

    B Yes, they're fine. Thanks for asking.

    If B just matches the adjective, he could be going on to express reservations:

    A I hope they are OK.

    B Yes, OK.... [But they've been a lot better.]


    So your version sounds a bit odd to me; if they're fine, they're fine - what else can be wrong?

    b
    I've noticed many posters asking "Are these sentences fine?" I've never heard of this outside this newsgroup. As you say Bob, it sound much better if the person asks "Are these sentences OK, /or alright, /or correct, /or grammatical?" And it is up to the responder to say "Yes they're fine".
    I don't know whether that is accepted as idiomatic English anywhere else.

    It's similar (though less extreme) to the following example.
    Wife [ready to go out to dinner]: Do I look OK?
    Husband: You look gorgeous.
    It doesn't matter how many times the husband says this, the wife does not preempt the answer with "Do I look gorgeous?"

    Does is sound odd to you when posters ask if their sentences are fine?

  4. Roselin's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: plz reply

    I have heard people using the word concern. Because when friends ask about you /your family/relatives, they are concerned for their well being.

    So if they ask " how is your mother?" and the second person replies " she is fine. ( I need one more sentecne here besides thanks for asking. What can it be with the words THANKS AND CONCERN?)

    Is it wrong to say thanks for showing concern. Being said thanks for showing concern, the person concerned replied that she wasnt showing it. she was concerned. Both are different. That's why I put up this question here. If she meant to say that dont use the word showing because she was really worried for them, what would i say? THANKS FOR CONCERN?

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: plz reply

    Quote Originally Posted by Roselin View Post
    I have heard people using the word concern. Because when friends ask about you /your family/relatives, they are concerned for their well being.

    So if they ask " how is your mother?" and the second person replies " she is fine. ( I need one more sentecne here besides thanks for asking. What can it be with the words THANKS AND CONCERN?)

    Is it wrong to say thanks for showing concern. Being said thanks for showing concern, the person concerned replied that she wasnt showing it. she was concerned. Both are different. That's why I put up this question here. If she meant to say that dont use the word showing because she was really worried for them, what would i say? THANKS FOR CONCERN?
    Your original 'Thanks for showing concern' was better. But don't underestimate 'Thanks for asking'. It shows deliberate understatement. The person has obviously not just asked, but has shown concern by asking.

    You could say 'Thanks for being concerned/caring enough to ask', but 'Thanks for asking' implies that, and saying any more might be thought to be rather gushing - in Br English, anyway.

    b

  6. Roselin's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: plz reply

    Thanks Ronbee..I think she was expecting me to say thanks for being concerned. .. I will use thanks for asking, now onwards.

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