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    #1

    tenses with up until today

    Oh, what a foolish thing to do! And why had they done it, Minna and Momma? For it must have been a conspiracy. They must have worked it out together-Momma's supposed illness, and the trip to Cape May, all to avoid a scandal. Nor would anyone have thought to question them, for Effie was always pregnant, it made sense that she should be pregnant. And Minna... who would have ever thought it of her? She was the schoolteacher, the caregiver. Never married. Up until today, Rose had wondered if she had ever even loved.

    Well, up until today, there was some mild weather and that's allowed crews to remove some hazardous trees that could have fallen into the road that leads to the east entrance.

    The mood up until today has been incredibly anxious of waiting for this report to come out.

    Could you native speakers tell me why the same 'up until today' is used with different tenses in these sentences?
    Thank you in advance.

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    #2

    Re: tenses with up until today

    I'd say for these reasons:
    1 'Today' here means 'that day'; it's a past narrative- you'll find 'today' and 'now' used in past narratives.
    2 The mild weather has finished.
    3 The mood is still affected by the report; if the report is just out, there may be less anxiety but there's still a buzz of excitement or tension.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: tenses with up until today

    Well, up until today, there was some mild weather and that's allowed crews to remove some hazardous trees that could have fallen into the road that leads to the east entrance.

    'up until today' indicates a perspective from, from some point in the past, until today, a period of time. The Past tense form of the verb (as in the use of ['was') is 'factual' : an event/action either happened, or did not happen. Black or White. The concept of 'over a period of time' is irrelevant. Hence, the Present Perfect should have been used; and this is consistent with the clause following, and 'that's allowed' = that has allowed.

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