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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    phrasal Verb To look out fro

    hi,

    could you please tell me what does the phrasal verb to look out for means?

    I found out, that it means to search something with the eye. But also to try to get something. Is the last meaning right? and if, can it be used in both formal and informal language?

    thank you!
    alejandra

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    #2

    Re: phrasal Verb To look out fro

    There are many ways to use "look out for" - so we must see the sentence. Here are two samples of informal useage that may or may not fit your definitions:


    I want a new TV, so be on the look out for a sale at Walmart.

    He was a good brother, always looking out for the kids in the family.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: phrasal Verb To look out fro

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    hi,

    could you please tell me what does the phrasal verb to look out for means?

    I found out, that it means to search something with the eye. But also to try to get something. Is the last meaning right? and if, can it be used in both formal and informal language?

    thank you!
    alejandra
    To me, it has two main meanings.
    The first means, as you say, to search for something that you want.
    You might be driving, and say to your passenger: "Look out for a parking space".
    If you are shopping in a bookshop and your friend says "Can you look out for that book I wanted?", it doesn't mean she wants you to drop everything else and search for it, but just to be aware in case you see it.

    The other meaning is "to be careful of/for":
    You may be driving, and you are looking for parking spaces, and not keeping your eyes on the road. Your passenger says "Hey, look out for that pedestrian!".
    When you walk under ladders, look out for falling paint buckets.
    It can also be used in the sense that susie suggested - of looking out for your family and friends, which means to be thoughtful and caring of them.

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