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    #1

    How does a native respond to these questions?

    Hi,

    Could I please know some possible answers to the questions below?

    1. Will you come today?

    2. When will you come today?

    3. Can you please make it a bit earlier today?

    4. How longer will it take for you to arrive?

    Thanks for any help provided!

    Mr. Nutty

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    #2

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Nutty View Post
    Hi,

    Could I please know some possible answers to the questions below?

    Note: These are not conversations. They are individual responses of three different people to the same question:

    1. Will you come today?
    "Certainly! I'll see you later"
    "Gee, I'm sorry but I'm really backed up here. Can we make it tomorrow?"
    "Great! When?"


    2. When will you come today?
    "Oh, about 10? Will that be okay?"
    "After lunch."
    "Rats! I forgot all about it. I'll try to make it tomorrow."


    3. Can you please make it a bit earlier today?
    "No, sorry. I'm booked till then."
    "I could try to come around 8. Would that work?"
    "Certainly. When would be good?"


    4. How longer will it take for you to arrive?
    "I'm stuck in traffic now. I should be there in about 30 minutes."
    "Not long. I'm almost there now."
    "Don't jump! I'm coming!"


    Thanks for any help provided!

    Mr. Nutty
    .

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      • Vietnamese
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    #3

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    @jlinger Is the fourth sentence grammatical?

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    #4

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Oh, missed that.
    "How long [or How much longer] will it take ...."

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    #5

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    Oh, missed that.
    "How long [or How much longer] will it take ...."
    a part from this point, "for" has to be omitted.

    How long will it take you to ...

    Am I right?

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    #6

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    The "for" is unecesseary, may be omitted, but is not wrong.
    Apart, however, is one word, not two, in this context.

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    #7

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    The "for" is unecesseary, may be omitted, but is not wrong.
    Apart, however, is one word, not two, in this context.
    So, would you omit "for" in this sentence or not? which one is more common? Thank you so much

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    #8

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post

    "Certainly! I'll see you later"
    1.Can you please tell me the meaning of "later" here?
    2.Can I also say "in a while/shortly/soon/in a bit"?
    3.Can I say "I will be with you/I will be there/I will be along" for "I will see you"? I mean do they all have the same meaning?



    "Gee, I'm sorry but I'm really backed up here. Can we make it tomorrow?"

    1.Do I need a comma in front of "but"?
    2.Can you please tell me the meaning of "backed up" here?
    3.Can I also say "backed up at home today"?





    3. Can you please make it a bit earlier today?
    "No, sorry. I'm booked till then."

    Can you please tell me the meaning of "booked" here, and in what sense I can use it?


    "Don't jump! I'm coming!"

    Can you please tell me the meaning of "Don't jump!", and in what sense I can use it?
    ...

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    #9

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Nutty View Post
    ...
    Jeeze, you ask a lot of questions. So much so, my Quote Box doesn't work.

    "Certainly! I'll see you later"
    1.Can you please tell me the meaning of "later" here?
    2.Can I also say "in a while/shortly/soon/in a bit"?
    3.Can I say "I will be with you/I will be there/I will be along" for "I will see you"? I mean do they all have the same meaning?

    1. Later means, later. I will see you later. Not now, but later. Not earlier, but later. Later is a time period that comes after the current time period, or the time period under discussion. Got it? If not, ask me again, later.

    2. You can say whatever you wish. There are rules to grammar, but there are no rules to what you can say. You can say, "Later, 'gator" and it will be fine with me. (Short form for "See you later, alligator"). All your examples are also very common (more common than my 'gator joke).

    3. Basically, yes.



    "Gee, I'm sorry but I'm really backed up here. Can we make it tomorrow?"

    1.Do I need a comma in front of "but"?
    2.Can you please tell me the meaning of "backed up" here?
    3.Can I also say "backed up at home today"?


    1. Probably. Why not? Not essential, but if you like them, throw them in.
    2. Backed up means I have a lot of work on my plate here. I have lots of chores or deadlines to meet.
    3. Only if you worked at home. Or your home chores (sweeping, dishes, laundry) were the reason you can't get over to see me today.


    3. Can you please make it a bit earlier today?
    "No, sorry. I'm booked till then."

    Can you please tell me the meaning of "booked" here, and in what sense I can use it?
    Booked means my bulging social calendar is full, thank you. I have no room for more appointments. My book is full. I'm booked solid.
    You may use it whenever your own calendar is full.
    You may say, "May I book a room in your hotel for next Thursday?" or "I would like to book a reservation for dinner."


    "Don't jump! I'm coming!"

    Can you please tell me the meaning of "Don't jump!", and in what sense I can use it?
    Generally, this is used when you see your friend on the ledge of a skyscraper about to jump because he thinks no one cares. Surely this has happened to you several times? Oh, not really? Funny - it's never happened to me either. I was just being silly.


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    #10

    Re: How does a native respond to these questions?

    Hey, Jim!

    Thank you for answering my questions in such an understanding way! I very sorry for the apparent randomness of my questions, they were just on my mind.

    By the way, you've got an awesome sense of humour! I was almost cracked up, holding my chair for the fear of falling off it due to my uncontrollable laughter.

    May the road rise to meet you!


    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    Jeeze, you ask a lot of questions. So much so, my Quote Box doesn't work.

    "Certainly! I'll see you later"
    1.Can you please tell me the meaning of "later" here?
    2.Can I also say "in a while/shortly/soon/in a bit"?
    3.Can I say "I will be with you/I will be there/I will be along" for "I will see you"? I mean do they all have the same meaning?

    1. Later means, later. I will see you later. Not now, but later. Not earlier, but later. Later is a time period that comes after the current time period, or the time period under discussion. Got it? If not, ask me again, later.

    2. You can say whatever you wish. There are rules to grammar, but there are no rules to what you can say. You can say, "Later, 'gator" and it will be fine with me. (Short form for "See you later, alligator"). All your examples are also very common (more common than my 'gator joke).

    3. Basically, yes.



    "Gee, I'm sorry but I'm really backed up here. Can we make it tomorrow?"
    1.Do I need a comma in front of "but"?
    2.Can you please tell me the meaning of "backed up" here?
    3.Can I also say "backed up at home today"?


    1. Probably. Why not? Not essential, but if you like them, throw them in.
    2. Backed up means I have a lot of work on my plate here. I have lots of chores or deadlines to meet.
    3. Only if you worked at home. Or your home chores (sweeping, dishes, laundry) were the reason you can't get over to see me today.


    3. Can you please make it a bit earlier today?
    "No, sorry. I'm booked till then."
    Can you please tell me the meaning of "booked" here, and in what sense I can use it?
    Booked means my bulging social calendar is full, thank you. I have no room for more appointments. My book is full. I'm booked solid.
    You may use it whenever your own calendar is full.
    You may say, "May I book a room in your hotel for next Thursday?" or "I would like to book a reservation for dinner."


    "Don't jump! I'm coming!"
    Can you please tell me the meaning of "Don't jump!", and in what sense I can use it?
    Generally, this is used when you see your friend on the ledge of a skyscraper about to jump because he thinks no one cares. Surely this has happened to you several times? Oh, not really? Funny - it's never happened to me either. I was just being silly.

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