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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    Give me a way to say them.

    I am translating two Chinese terms into English.
    The terms are related. One means the residence that is very large and costs more land to build and more money to buy.
    The other, on the contrary that is small in scale and costs not that money to build and less money to buy.

    I think of " large residence" and "small residence", but I want something more formal and correct.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: Give me a way to say them.

    You might consider "mansion" or "estate" (the "estate" implies lots of land). A manor also connotes a large piece of property. The manor house sits on that property, and is usually asumed to be large.

    Borrowed words from other languages would include a villa or a chateau. Used in English, these connote rather grander, formal residences; a chateau, especially, suggests expansive property as well.

    A cottage or a cabin, on the other hand, connotes a smaller residence. A cottage may be very nice (and very expensive, in fact); a cabin is usually less formal, perhaps of rough-hewn wood. Each region has its own way of speaking of a "second home" - a lake cottage in Canada is often bigger and grander than my city home! In Arizona, where I grew up, people owned a "cabin" in the mountains, and it may have been rough and simple, or grand as well. A lodge also implies a country home, larger than a normal home.

    A bungalow is a single storey home, perhaps with basement, usually a square or rectangular floor plan. A ranch-style home is single storey with no basement, typically, but rambling a bit more (maybe with a L- or U-shaped floor plan).

    A shack, shanty or a hovel is a poor dwelling, patched together with scrap material usually.

    Do these help?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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    #3

    Re: Give me a way to say them.

    I am afraid not

    I think I need a general word for the place where they live, and a descriptive word for the type of the house. I think the size(big,small) is the emphasis.

    I think I have found the word "residence"--- the place where they live, but I don't know how to replace "big or small".

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