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    #1

    choice

    When we say in a noun that we choose this or that, do we say it's a choice between A and B, or it's a choice between A or B?

  1. Noego's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: choice

    When we say in a noun that we choose this or that, do we say it's a choice between A and B, or it's a choice between A or B?
    Ohh... you lost me. 0___o

    The last part is exactly the same thing twice.

    It's like saying:

    Do you like to dance?

    or

    Do you like to dance?

    Could you rephrase your question differently? ;)

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    #3

    Re: choice

    Of course.
    Do we say :
    It's a choice between A and B.
    Or:
    It's a choice between A or B.

    Hope that helps

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    #4

    Re: choice

    Quote Originally Posted by AUTOMOON View Post
    Of course.
    Do we say :
    It's a choice between A and B.
    Or:
    It's a choice between A or B.

    Hope that helps
    Choose between A or/and B?
    Interestingly, most grammarians regard or as another form of additive (sometimes called cumulative) relationship, like and. As far as grammatical consequences are concerned, that’s fair enough; I can’t think of any sentence where changing and to or would require any other change — to punctuation, word order or any other aspect of the sentence’s grammar. But there’s a world of difference at the semantic level — ‘A or B’ is not two things. (In any given situation, it might be: ‘Are you hungry or thirsty? Both.’ But that’s not inherent in the meaning of or.) So the choice must be between A and B: ‘You can choose tea or coffee’ but ‘You can choose between tea and coffee’.

    Source http://www.editorswa.com/documents/b...ive/bw0210.pdf

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    #5

    Re: choice

    Oops! So sorry I completely missed the difference there! 0__o

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    #6

    Re: choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Choose between A or/and B?
    Interestingly, most grammarians regard or as another form of additive (sometimes called cumulative) relationship, like and. As far as grammatical consequences are concerned, that’s fair enough; I can’t think of any sentence where changing and to or would require any other change — to punctuation, word order or any other aspect of the sentence’s grammar. But there’s a world of difference at the semantic level — ‘A or B’ is not two things. (In any given situation, it might be: ‘Are you hungry or thirsty? Both.’ But that’s not inherent in the meaning of or.) So the choice must be between A and B: ‘You can choose tea or coffee’ but ‘You can choose between tea and coffee’.

    Source http://www.editorswa.com/documents/b...ive/bw0210.pdf
    Thank you for your reply, though I can't figure it out what you meant clearly, especially why you give me a example in the sentence bracked.

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    #7

    Re: choice

    Here's my take on it.

    A or B is not two things, it's one or the other.

    The answer you're looking for is:

    It's a choice between A and B.

    The paragraph is a bit hard to understand however. I'm not certain about this, I thought you should know.

    Let's see what Soup has to say

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    #8

    Re: choice

    Quote Originally Posted by AUTOMOON View Post
    Thank you for your reply, though I can't figure it out what you meant clearly, especially why you give me a example in the sentence bracked.
    Without 'between'
    Ex: You can choose A or B. Just one thing, not both.


    With 'between'
    Ex: You can choose between (these two things) A and B.

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