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  1. #1

    Which or that

    Hi,

    I have a sentence in which I am not sure if "that" or "which" should be used:

    I love photos of women with the curves on their bodies, that/which means I am an optimistic person.

    Please help me to overcome this, I want to use an adjective clause there
    Last edited by LeUyenHoc; 01-Dec-2008 at 01:54.

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    #2

    Re: Which or that

    "That" introduces a restrictive clause, that is, one that restricts the meaning of the sentence.
    "Which" introduces a non-restrictive clause, that is one that may be completely removed from the sentence without changing the meaning.

    Restrictive clauses limit the possible meaning of a preceding subject.
    Nonrestrictive clauses tell you something about a preceding subject, but they do not limit, or restrict, the meaning of that subject.


    The subject in your sentence is your love of photos of women with curves on their bodies (and for the sake of this discussion, let's ignore the rather awkward phrasing of this fetish, other than dropping the unnecessary article.)

    In your sentence,
    I love photos of women with [the -deleted] curves on their bodies, that/which means I am a optimistic person.

    you may remove entirely
    that/which means I am a optimistic person.

    and you are left with
    I love photos of women with curves on their bodies,

    and it still means the same thing. The subject has not been changed or restricted.

    If the sentence were
    I love photos of women that/which shows off their curves

    and you removed
    that/which shows off their curves

    you would be left with
    I love photos of women

    but that may not be true, for you do not like photos UNLESS they show off the curves.


    Another way is to take the clause and put it into parenthesis. If it works, then it's a which clause.

    I love photos of women with curves on their bodies (which means I am a optimistic person).

    See?

    If you finally decide on "which" then you need a comma in front of it.
    If you decide on "that" then you do not use a comma.

    If you insist on using "that" in your sentence, then you must make two sentences out of it:
    I love photos of women with curves on their bodies. That means I am a optimistic person.
    or a semicolon
    I love photos of women with curves on their bodies; that means I am a optimistic person.

    But in both these examples, see how we took that last phrase AWAY from the principal sentence? You do this with either a "which" clause, or by a separate sentence (or a separate sentence tied closely to the first with a semicolon).

    The answer to your question is:
    I love photos of women with curves on their bodies, which means I am a optimistic person.
    Last edited by jlinger; 30-Nov-2008 at 23:15.

  2. #3

    Re: Which or that

    Hi jlinger,

    You are my good teacher

    Thank you very much

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    #4

    Re: Which or that

    You are quite welcome.

    Now let's look at the phrase itself:
    I love photos of women with the curves on their bodies, that/which means I am an optimistic person.

    As mentioned earlier, we don't need the definite article the with curves.

    It is clear that the curves will be on their bodies, and the adjective of curve is either curvy or curvaceous, the last one of which is more commonly associated with women.

    An optimistic person is an optimist. Don't need the person in there at all.

    You need the an form of a/an before the initial vowel sound of optimist.


    So let's try instead
    I love photos of curvaceous women, which means I am an optimist.
    Last edited by jlinger; 01-Dec-2008 at 23:14.

  3. #5

    Re: Which or that

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    You are quite welcome.

    Now let's look at the phrase itself:
    I love photos of women with the curves on their bodies, that/which means I am an optimistic person.

    As mentioned earlier, we don't need the definite article the with curves.

    It is clear that the curves will be on their bodies, and the adjective of curve is either curvy or curvaceous, the last one of which is more commonly associated with women.

    An optimistic person is an optimist. Don't need the person in there at all.

    You need the an form of a/an before the ial nitivowel sound of optimist.


    So let's try instead
    I love photos of curvaceous women, which means I am an optimist.
    Hi,

    It seems better. Thankssssssssssssssssssssssss

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