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    #1

    to lead, view, through, grow

    Dear teachers,
    I have four questions to ask:

    No.1
    There was a curved courtyard that had steps_______ down into the street.
    a. leading b. to lead
    The key is 'a'. No problem. But I think if 'b' is used as an attribute it is also correct. Is that right?

    No.2
    There were no cars in _________.
    a. sight b. view
    The key is 'a'. No problem. But there is also a phrase 'in view', which means according to the dictionary 'close enough to be seen'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct?

    No.3
    He glanced ____ the ambulance yard and there was no car there.
    a. into b. through
    The key is 'a', which means 'He glanced within the boundary of the yard'. 'b' is not correct because it means "He glanced beyond the yard or outside the boundary of the yard". Is that right?

    No.4
    The yound man ________ a heavy shock of black hair.
    a. had b. grew c. possessed d. wore
    The key is 'a'. Could you please kindly explain why the other three is not correct? Is it due to collocations?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    Good questions.

    3. Yes; though 'glance' means to take a brief or hurried look. To look into the yard and refocus to see 'through it', to or beyond its far side, would require more than a 'glance'.

    Let's see what others think about the others.

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    #3

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    Dear David,

    Is it possible that other teachers would think you have explained all the questions so that they won't bother to read my thread?

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Good questions.

    3. Yes; though 'glance' means to take a brief or hurried look. To look into the yard and refocus to see 'through it', to or beyond its far side, would require more than a 'glance'.

    Let's see what others think about the others.


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    #4

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    I should think that native speakers actually read posts carefully,,,and even if not, could see with a glance at my post that I had NOT addressed all your points.

    Don't fret!
    It's just a bad time of day over here - they're otherwise engaged. They'll be logging on a little later.
    Last edited by David L.; 03-Dec-2008 at 17:08.

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    #5

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow


    Dear David,

    Thank you very much for reply. Now I feel at ease.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    I should think that native speakers actually read posts carefully,,,and even if not, could see with a glance at my post that I had NOT addressed all your points.

    Don't fret!
    It's just a bad time of day over here - they're otherwise engaged. They'll be logging on a little later.


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    #6

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    Hmm. I'm surprised. Nobody intrigued by this post to bring their juices to bear on the questions?

    I'll have a go after tea!


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    #7

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    The yound man ________ a heavy shock of black hair.
    a. had b. grew c. possessed d. wore
    The key is 'a'. Could you please kindly explain why the other three ARE not correct? Is it due to collocations?

    'a shock of hair' is an unkempt, thick mass of hair.

    It is 'hair' that grows; and if not cut, and not combed, will be thick and unruly - a shock of hair. A 'shock of hair' does not itself 'grow'.

    We don't refer to 'owning/possessing' parts of our own body - we don't say "I own/possess two arms", in a concrete sense; nor "I possess a shock of hair."
    (There is a use in which we refer to 'possess' as having an ability or personal quality, as in "She possesses a winning smile." An author might refer to a young man as 'possessing a shock of hair', as if he was sporting it, showing it of, was making it part of his 'image', as opposed to 'it just grew that way', which I think we have to accept is intended in the sentence.)

    'to wear' means to have on one's body or a part of one's body as clothing, decoration, or protection.
    Again, we can say that "She wears her hair long"; but again, in the sentence, it is more likely that a 'shock of hair' is by default, not a fashion statement.
    'had', therefore, is the 'safest' choice.

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    #8

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    No.1
    There was a curved courtyard that had steps_______ down into the street.
    a. leading b. to lead
    The key is 'a'. No problem. But I think if 'b' is used as an attribute it is also correct. Is that right?

    I would say either 'leading' or 'which led'.


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    #9

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    No.2
    There were no cars in _________.
    a. sight b. view
    The key is 'a'. No problem. But there is also a phrase 'in view', which means according to the dictionary 'close enough to be seen'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct?


    'in view' refers to being within the maximum range of one's vision, and so emphasizes the idea of looking towards the horizon, to the distance, to see when returning ships 'come into view', that is, enter the maximum range of what we can see. A mountain can obscure our view, so that when we round a bend in the mountain, something then 'comes into view'.

    'in sight' has the idea of 'able to be seen as one looks around, near and far.'

    The sentence, "There were no cars in view" suggests the idea of expecting cars to arrive, as in some cross-country race, but they were still not visible on the horizon, or still had not appeared at the far end of a road, (or as much of the road as one could see).


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    #10

    Re: to lead, view, through, grow

    No.1
    There was a curved courtyard that had steps_______ down into the street.
    a. leading b. to lead
    The key is 'a'. No problem. But I think if 'b' is used as an attribute it is also correct. Is that right?


    Ahhh. The 'gerund versus the infinitive' problem!

    To help explain the principle (the 'rule' if you will) that determines the choice between the two, look at these two sentences:

    "The building has three elevators, providing/giving easy access to the upper floors."
    compare
    "The building will need to have an elevator installed, to provide easier access to the upper floors."

    In the second sentence, we are looking (i) to the future and (ii) what we are referring to is of a hypothetical nature: 'if we would like to provide easier access to the upper floors/if this is an important issue, then we would need to install an elevator'.

    In contrast, the first sentence is a factual reference to a current state of affairs: it does have an elevator and it does provide easy access.

    (This can also to be seen in "I like going to Venice' - a factual reference to the fact that I've been, probably more than once, and have enjoyed the experience - compare: "I would like to go to Venice" - looking to the future, and saying that ' if I went to Venice, I'm sure I would enjoy it.'

    Can you see, then, that your original sentence is a factual statement about a current state of affairs: the courtyard has curved steps leading down to the street'. The infinitive would not be appropriate.
    Last edited by David L.; 04-Dec-2008 at 21:12.

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