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  1. charles1
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    #1

    Help with a phrase or idiom.

    There is a certain idiom, and about its particulars my wife and I, both native speakers of English, disagree. She says "whatever blows your skirt," and means, somewhat disparagingly, "whatever." I cannot recall exactly how this idiom is constructed, but I think it is something about "blowing air up your skirt," and I think it pertains to flattery, or trying to fool someone. I have been unable to find anything on this on the internet. Can anyone please help on this?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • England
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      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #2

    Re: Help with a phrase or idiom.

    Quote Originally Posted by charles1 View Post
    There is a certain idiom, and about its particulars my wife and I, both native speakers of English, disagree. She says "whatever blows your skirt," and means, somewhat disparagingly, "whatever." I cannot recall exactly how this idiom is constructed, but I think it is something about "blowing air up your skirt," and I think it pertains to flattery, or trying to fool someone. I have been unable to find anything on this on the internet. Can anyone please help on this?
    I have never heard this expression.

  3. Amigos4's Avatar
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      • American English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,912
    #3

    Re: Help with a phrase or idiom.

    Quote Originally Posted by charles1 View Post
    There is a certain idiom, and about its particulars my wife and I, both native speakers of English, disagree. She says "whatever blows your skirt," and means, somewhat disparagingly, "whatever." I cannot recall exactly how this idiom is constructed, but I think it is something about "blowing air up your skirt," and I think it pertains to flattery, or trying to fool someone. I have been unable to find anything on this on the internet. Can anyone please help on this?
    Hi, Charles! Let me take a wild guess on the meaning of this idiom! I recall a movie with Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell called the "Seven Year Itch"...the film takes place on a very hot and steamy summer night in New York City. There is a famous scene where Marilyn is standing on the sidewalk over a subway vent. The upward movement of air from the vent blows up Marilyn's skirt and, essentially, offers her temporary relief from the scorching summer heat! I'm sure you have seen this famous photograph somewhere in your travels! It is a classic!
    http://images.easyart.com/i/prints/r...ster-19001.jpg

    Cheers,
    Amigo

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