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    #1

    No curbing

    The following sentences are about trash hungters and I am not sure what the red parts mean.

    1. Curb Appeal( it is a tile of this article)

    2. No curbing Marylyn( it is a subtitle of this article)

    3. I plugged it in, ran it for two days in my garage. The TV never shut off.

    4. Other finds streo components, vacuum cleaners .. and a safe( THe owner had lost the combination:Kutnyak is getting a replacement from the manufacturer)

    5. I go rummaging on Tuesday when the garbage collection is.


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    #2

    Re: No curbing

    Quote Originally Posted by bosun View Post
    The following sentences are about trash hungters and I am not sure what the red parts mean.

    1. Curb Appeal( it is a tile of this article) The appeal of looking for and finding items on the curb of the road

    2. No curbing Marylyn( it is a subtitle of this article) No stopping Marylyn.


    3. I plugged it in, ran it for two days in my garage. The TV never shut off. The TV was plugged in and left on for two days without going off.

    4. Other finds streo components, vacuum cleaners .. and a safe( THe owner had lost the combination:Kutnyak is getting a replacement from the manufacturer) Combination = the numbers used to open the safe - the owner has forgotten/lost the sequence. Kutnyak is getting a replacement lock for the safe.

    5. I go rummaging on Tuesday when the garbage collection is. when the garbage collection takes place.
    ..

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: No curbing

    Should it not be 'kerb' rather than 'curb'?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: No curbing

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Should it not be 'kerb' rather than 'curb'?
    Interesting question. "Kerb" is marked in the only printed dictionary I have to hand as 'chiefly not US', and is described here (Online Etymology Dictionary ) as the 'preferred British spelling in certain specialized senses, especially "edging of stone on a sidewalk" (1805)'. But the definition for "curb" (in the same dictionary) is '"margin of stone between a sidewalk and road" 1836 (sometimes spelled kerb)'.

    But I admit I was surprised at Anglika's tolerance of a spelling that I am used to seeing in more transatlantic sources.

    b


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    #5

    Re: No curbing

    I took it that the article was American, and being a bit rushed did not explain spelling differences

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: No curbing

    In the US, it's "curb," and the practice of rummaging through other peoples' garbage is called either "dumpster diving" or "curb crawling." Dumpster diving refers to getting into those huge trash bins located behind businesses and pawing through the refuse, while curb crawling involves driving slowly along the curb on trash pick-up day to see if there is anything worth retrieving. The first bicycle I ever owned was assembled from various components my Dad picked up while curb crawling.

    I personally would never climb into a dumpster, but apparently there are treasures to be had. I've read stories of folks finding, for example, pairs of brand new shoes in the dumpster behind major shoe stores (discarded because they'd been scratched or scuffed and were not saleable).

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: No curbing

    Is this from an American dictionary? I ask because of the term 'sidewalk' which I have always thought was exclusively American, as opposed to the Britsh term 'pavement'.

    '"margin of stone between a sidewalk and road" 1836 (sometimes spelled kerb)'.

  5. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: No curbing

    In AmE, the sidewalk is a paved path for pedestrian traffic. In neighborhoods, the sidewalk is located at the base of the homeowners' front lawn ("garden" in BrE).

    The curb is a rounded cement base that separates the road or street from the homeowner's property.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: No curbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    ... The first bicycle I ever owned was assembled from various components my Dad picked up while curb crawling.

    ...
    Br Eng/Am Eng alert! A 'kerb crawler' drives slowly, on the look-out for something, but that's where the similarity ends. The 'something' in question is a prostitute.

    b

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