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      • Native Language:
      • German
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      • Germany
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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #1

    messer

    Hi

    Is a messer someone who makes a lot of mess?

    I was a freckle-faced kid who was difficult to tie down from the very beginning, a messer full of life and mischief, noisy, maybe a little too much testosterone.

    Thanks


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #2

    Re: messer

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    Is a messer someone who makes a lot of mess?

    I was a freckle-faced kid who was difficult to tie down from the very beginning, a messer full of life and mischief, noisy, maybe a little too much testosterone.

    Thanks
    I couldn't find it in either a British or American dictionary, but I do hear some of my (less linguistically skilled) friends saying it.

    It is used to describe someone who is "a bit of a mess". A label open to interpretation. A more refined word for such a person would probably be something like "inept".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1,638
    #3

    Re: messer

    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    I couldn't find it in either a British or American dictionary, but I do hear some of my (less linguistically skilled) friends saying it.

    It is used to describe someone who is "a bit of a mess". A label open to interpretation. A more refined word for such a person would probably be something like "inept".
    Hi

    Yes, but inept is an adjective and "messer" is a noun. But thanks for your explanations


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #4

    Re: messer

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    Yes, but inept is an adjective and "messer" is a noun. But thanks for your explanations
    That's true, but they'd both be used as complements and equate to (roughly) the same thing so I don't see why the distinction is relevant here.

    He is inept

    He is a messer

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