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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    myself vs me

    Which is correct?

    Should you have any questions or concerns in the meantime, please feel free to contact either myself at #222-5555 and/or Joe Blow at #222-5598

    OR

    Should you have any questions or concerns in the meanitme, please feel free to contact me at#222-8998 and/or Joe Blow at 555-8997


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: myself vs me

    me - standard
    myself - emphatic


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #3

    Re: myself vs me

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Which is correct?

    Should you have any questions or concerns in the meantime, please feel free to contact either myself at #222-5555 and/or Joe Blow at #222-5598

    OR

    Should you have any questions or concerns in the meanitme, please feel free to contact me at#222-8998 and/or Joe Blow at 555-8997
    Me is correct.

    Look at the construction in isolation: feel free to contact myself

    Myself is normally used as a reflexive pronoun, and serves to indicate that the subject is the object of the verb:

    I have hurt myself.

    They can only blame themselves for this mess.

    Therefore the reflexive pronouns should be accomanied a personal pronoun or another form of a noun (which represents the same entity as the reflexive pronoun).


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #4

    Re: myself vs me

    My husband and myself are both doctors. (Longman Dictionary of English Language anf Culture)

    Sometimes 'myself' is used in positions other than to say that the subject and the object of an action are one and the same person.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #5

    Re: myself vs me

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    My husband and myself are both doctors. (Longman Dictionary of English Language anf Culture)

    Sometimes 'myself' is used in positions other than to say that the subject and the object of an action are one and the same person.
    Yes, there are other uses.

    That is why I wrote usually used as reflexive pronoun.

    In day to day English, it is the most common use.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • England
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      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #6

    Re: myself vs me

    In fact you can use this, Should you have any questions or concerns in the meantime, please feel free to contact either myself at #222-5555 and/or Joe Blow at #222-5598
    Or you can use 'me' both are ok.

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      • Germany
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      • Canada

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    #7

    Re: myself vs me

    While I am no English teacher, the use of me and myself is one of those things that really, really bothers me. If you say
    My husband and myself are both doctors. (Longman Dictionary of English Language anf Culture)

    And divide this into two sentences, would you ever say "My husband is a doctor" and "myself is a doctor"?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #8

    Re: myself vs me

    My husband and myself are both doctors. (Longman Dictionary of English Language anf Culture)

    And divide this into two sentences, would you ever say "My husband is a doctor" and "myself is a doctor"?[/quote]

    No you wouldn't, but you can't always break things down into their separate parts. When broken down in that way we can see that it is not, strictly speaking, grammatical but it is very widely used. As is 'I, myself, am a doctor.' For example.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #9

    Re: myself vs me

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    My husband and myself are both doctors. (Longman Dictionary of English Language anf Culture)

    And divide this into two sentences, would you ever say "My husband is a doctor" and "myself is a doctor"?
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    No you wouldn't, but you can't always break things down into their separate parts. When broken down in that way we can see that it is not, strictly speaking, grammatical but it is very widely used. As is 'I, myself, am a doctor.' For example.
    I do agree, bhaisahab, that the sentence we're examining is to some extent "acceptable" (in that it doesn't look unusual) - but I feel that here we should perhaps condemn it as incorrect. Just because a mistake seems to reoccur, I don't think we should begin to give in to its persistence!

    "I myself am a doctor" is correct within any grammar. It is an example of an emphatic pronoun.

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