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    #1

    let myself in

    When she returned home late I'd have let myself in and sit eating bread and jam, listening to the radio.

    I had come up a flight of stairs into the apartment and let myself in.

    Don't get up, I can let myself in.

    I came home, let myself in, locked the front door, and went down to the study.


    Hi,
    I heard this expression in a movie and wonder if it means exactly the same as ''to get in [a place]'' or ''to enter [a place]''.
    If so, I also would like to know if there is a specific reason to say it this way and not any other way, please.
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: let myself in

    Dear jctgf:

    Yes, it means that the person is entering, usually, a house or flat, and that s/he has a key or is otherwise able to gain entry without assistance.

    Petra

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    #3

    Re: let myself in

    Quote Originally Posted by pyoung View Post
    Dear jctgf:

    Yes, it means that the person is entering, usually, a house or flat, and that s/he has a key or is otherwise able to gain entry without assistance.

    Petra
    thanks!!

    when you stress ''has a key'' do you mean it literally? if someone opens the door to me to enter the house, can I say that "I let myself in"'?

    does it mean "by my own and licit means"?

    thanks.


    • Join Date: Dec 2008
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    #4

    Re: let myself in

    Hi All,

    "Let myself in" also implies that the person entering is not the owner / regular occupant of the dwelling, but is visiting, however is familiar enough with the place to not practice the protocols of being a guest for the first time. It falls under the conventions of " make yourself at home".

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    #5

    Re: let myself in

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    thanks!!

    when you stress ''has a key'' do you mean it literally? Yes. if someone opens the door to me to enter the house, can I say that "I let myself in"'? If someone opens the door to you, that person is letting you in.

    If you are staying with friends for some time, and you are going to a party without them, your hosts may say, "We go to bed very early. Here's a key, so you can let yourself in if you get back late.

    does it mean "by my own and licit means"? It certainly means 'on my own', but not necessarily by licit means. A spy or burglar may obtain a key to let him/herself in illicitly.

    thanks.
    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

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    #6

    Re: let myself in

    thanks a lot!
    I still have a few doubts about it, please.
    If I get to my home, find out that I've lost my keys and enter the house by breaking the lock, can I say that "I let myself in''? if a burglar enters my house by breaking the lock, did he/she ''let himself/herself in'' or is there a more suitable term for this situation, please?
    Thanks once more.
    Last edited by jctgf; 13-Dec-2008 at 03:02.

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    #7

    Re: let myself in

    Dear jctgf:

    You could say it, but it's more likely you would say, 'I managed to get in,' or 'I got in by breaking the lock,' or something like that. 'Let myself in', generally implies entering without any extraordinary effort.

    I am starting to think of the old Beatles' song: She Came in through the Bathroom Window...

    Petra

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