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    #1

    except

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions to ask:

    No.1
    I did not know what to do with the dying cat except clasp it to my bosom.
    Here 'except' means 'but'.
    Here is another sentence:
    I learned through the crisis that I don't have to do very much for a friend in deep sorrow except to be with him.
    My question is: Can I say
    I learned through the crisis that I don't have to do very much for a friend in deep sorrow except be with him.

    No.2
    His apartment had been broken _________ twice within two months. So he had decided to move ______ safety.
    a. into, for the sake of b. in, for the benefit of
    The key is 'a'. No problem. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct?
    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 13-Dec-2008 at 15:48.


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    #2

    Re: except

    Are you suggesting that this is the correct sentence?

    His apartment had been broken into, for the sake of twice within two months.

    I do not understand what role for the sake of plays in this sentence?

    It doesn't look correct to me.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: except

    His apartment had been broken __into_______ twice within two months. So he had decided to move for the sake of______.

    The second sentence is incomplete.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: except

    1a. ... except to be with him.
    1b. ... except be with him.

    No. 2
    Having to move because your home has been broken into more than once isn't an advantage; it's an inconvenience (i.e., you don't benefit from the move. It's a hassle.)

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    #5

    Re: except

    Dear colloquium,

    I am terribly sorry I didn't realize I missed the word 'safety' until I read you reply.
    According to the key the correct sence is:
    His apartment had been broken into twice within two months. So he had decided to move for the sake of safety.
    My question is: Is it correct to say (that is 'b')
    His apartment had been broken in twice within two months. So he had decided to move for the benefit of safety.
    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang



    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    Are you suggesting that this is the correct sentence?

    His apartment had been broken into, for the sake of twice within two months.

    I do not understand what role for the sake of plays in this sentence?

    It doesn't look correct to me.

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    #6

    Re: except

    Hi Soup,

    Thank you very much for your explanation.

    I missed the word 'safety' in the second sentence. It should be:
    His apartment had been broken _________ twice within two months. So he had decided to move ______ safety.
    a. into, for the sake of b. in, for the benefit of

    According to your explanation 'for the benefit of' is not correct because moving doesn't benefit him. Is that right? I think I have two problems. First, I can't distinguish between "for the sake of" and 'for the benefit of''.
    According to my dictionary:
    for sb's benefit: in order to help somebody; to be useful to them
    for the same of: in order to help improve
    Second, the first part of the sentence is correct. Is that right? I mean I can say 'his house was broken into' . I can also say 'his house was broken in'. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    1a. ... except to be with him.
    1b. ... except be with him.

    No. 2
    Having to move because your home has been broken into more than once isn't an advantage; it's an inconvenience (i.e., you don't benefit from the move. It's a hassle.)

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    #7

    Re: except


    Dear colloquium,
    I made a mistake. It should be

    His apartment had been broken ________ twice within two months. So he had decided to move__________safety.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    Are you suggesting that this is the correct sentence?

    His apartment had been broken into, for the sake of twice within two months.

    I do not understand what role for the sake of plays in this sentence?

    It doesn't look correct to me.

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    #8

    Re: except


    Dear bhaisahab,

    I made a mistake. It should be

    His apartment had been broken ________ twice within two months. So he had decided to move__________safety.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    His apartment had been broken __into_______ twice within two months. So he had decided to move for the sake of______.

    The second sentence is incomplete.

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: except

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    According to your explanation 'for the benefit of' is not correct because moving doesn't benefit him. Is that right?[
    Yes. It's for the sake/reason of his safety that he is moving. Safety is the reason, the cause.

    for the sake of means for the cause or interest of something/someone.
    My dictionaries also use the word benefit to describe for the sake of. Note, however, that benefit cannot replace sake semantically.

    ---------------------------

    his house was broken in <colloquialism>

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: except

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    his house was broken in <colloquialism>
    Perhaps by having a house-warming party. Otherwise, horses are broken in, and houses are broken into.

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